How Rabia Z built a modest fashion empire

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Rabia Zargapur wearing her line’s organic linen abaya and signature breathable jersey hijab, the best-selling hijab in the world. (Irthi Contemporary Arts and Crafts Council)
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Rabia Zargapur was one of a few designers selected to showcase a couture piece using Swarovski elements for the Swarovski Sparkling Couture Exhibition in Dubai. This piece is the ‘Revival of the Emirati Mukhawara Dress.’
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Rabia Z’s head to toe demi-couture collection and signature jersey hijab are sold on Modanisa. (Rooful Ali)
Updated 22 August 2018
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How Rabia Z built a modest fashion empire

  • Rabia Z. Zargarpur’s brand first came to life in 2002
  • To Zargarpur, modest fashion is more exciting than ever

DUBAI: Rabia Z. Zargarpur is a superwoman. Learning about her insane current schedule, one wonders when she finds the time to eat and sleep.
Business trips aside, the designer – the force behind the renowned modest fashion brand Rabia Z – has been focusing on the official launch of her Rabia Z Modest Fashion Academy, plus her online Rabia Z Mentorship Program. Then there’s her consulting work, rebranded Rabia Z launch and sustainable fashion collection.
“And of course, family time with my husband, entertaining our 6-year-old twins and our 14-year-old son, who are off for the summer,” the 40-year-old founder, CEO and creative director told Arab News. “So yeah, pretty much business as usual!”
Zargarpur’s brand first came to life in 2002, as one of the world’s first modest fashion, ready-to-wear e-commerce stores, a time when the industry certainly wasn’t as known as it is today.
“We were producing the basics line in Dubai and selling out of San Francisco from my grandfather’s garage,” the Emirati-Afghan-American explains. “We relaunched as a full-on designer brand back in Dubai, on runways in 2006, and won the Emerging Designer Award at Dubai Fashion Week in 2007.”
She went on to showcase modest fashion on mainstream runways and fashion weeks across cities including New York, London, Milan, Abu Dhabi and Dubai. Buyers and customers certainly took notice – today, Rabia Z sells to 71 countries.
To Zargarpur, modest fashion is more exciting than ever. “It is finally ‘du jour,’” she exclaimed. “For me – (someone) who has tirelessly worked almost 18 years, the majority of it towards building awareness for this huge market at a time when neither this sector nor the term ‘modest fashion’ existed – I am happy to see it flourish globally.”
Now she predicts that it’s Saudi Arabia’s turn to fully embrace the market. “Saudi women have always been style savvy and with the major changes we’ve seen this year, we will see some of the styles and collections in the GCC come out of Saudi,” she said. “I think modest fashion will especially boom there next.”
Nonetheless, she admits that there remain challenges in the industry. “It’s a work in progress and lots needs improving,” she said. “We need more serious, true global brands that are professional and to the standards of major mainstream designer and retail brands. We need a more sustainable industry and ethical, eco-friendly brands.
“The supply chain is another area of improvement. We need labels that have a strong DNA and an innovative or creative direction which is currently lacking.”
Back to her own business, fans of Rabia Z have plenty to look forward to. “We have always been an ethical brand and always worked with breathable and sustainable fabrics, but upon the relaunch of Rabia Z next year, we would like to not only highlight that in our collections, but also adopt more variety of sustainable fabrics,” Zargarpur said, adding that there will be a separate roll out of Rabia Z Accessories.
She is continuing her collaboration with major online retailer Modanisa on Rabia Z’s licensed hijab line, its signature breathable, combed cotton jersey hijab wraps that are the best-selling hijab in the world. “(It) celebrates its 15th anniversary this year and is being exhibited at the Contemporary Muslim Fashion Exhibition in San Francisco this fall.”
On a personal level, Zargarpur aims to return to academia. “I was offered the opportunity to do a PhD in the Business of Fashion by the London College of Fashion, which I hope to pursue in the next couple of years, InshaAllah,” says Zargarpur, who already holds a business major with a minor in fashion. “In addition to having my PhD, I would like to see our flagship stores in key cities around the world someday, sitting alongside major brands.”
Yup, looks like she won’t be getting much sleep anytime soon.


MUSE: Rawan bin Hussain talks social media stardom

Updated 20 September 2018
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MUSE: Rawan bin Hussain talks social media stardom

  • Rawan Bin Hussain is one of the largest influencers in the region
  • Aside from launching a lipstick line, the Kuwaiti blogger studies law in London

DUBAI: The Kuwaiti influencer, who has 3 million Instagram followers, talks about studying law, learning to fly and why gender biases are ‘so 1800s’

Being a fashion blogger is not the opposite of being a lawyer – they don’t conflict. I didn’t leave law behind. I’m still studying it. I could have moved to Dubai and made millions a month like other bloggers, but I’m not. I’m living in London making nothing a month because education comes first for me.
To show that lawyers don’t only fight for justice in court, but also in real life by giving back to the community, I launched a law association in Kuwait for female law students, law graduates and lawyers. If you have knowledge in the field of law, I want your experience and we can work together to do charity work and attend workshops.
I’ve always loved traveling around the world, so why not have my own license and my own airplane jetting around the world?
I don’t mind taking risks because I think people who don’t take risks are cowards. Life is fun, life is full of experiences, full of lessons. If you don’t fail and if you don’t learn from your mistakes, you won’t achieve anything in life. It doesn’t come on a plate of gold. You have to work for it.

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Happy to be here! @noorandzee

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A lot of people think that when you are a beauty icon, you are an empty head, empty-minded. We are not. A lot of bloggers are good mothers to their children, they are engineers, doctors, lawyers. They have a career, they just choose to do blogging, which is what they love, and I respect it because you should do what you love and love what you do.
We need to stop stereotyping, criticizing, judging based on the way she looks, the way she dresses, the way she appeals to others. I cannot please everybody as, most of all, I need to please myself.
I regret being too transparent sometimes. I am too spontaneous. I say my opinion in a very casual way – maybe I don’t think about the circumstances or the consequences. But if you don’t make mistakes, you don’t learn a lesson.  
We shouldn’t look as men as competition or a dangerous threat. We can work together to make this world a better place.
As a woman, I want to say look at me, I’m here. I can be a lawyer, a pilot, a public figure, an entrepreneur. I am capable of doing so many things. Men need to see that and respect that and not underestimate us because we are females. Judgment based on gender is so 1800s.