Indonesian man pays $10,000 to ex-wife ... in coins

The Indonesian court ordered its staff to count the money, which was worth 153 million rupiah.(AFP)
Updated 24 August 2018
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Indonesian man pays $10,000 to ex-wife ... in coins

  • Dwi Susilarto arrived at court on Thursday hauling a dozen sacks filled with 153 million rupiah ($10,500) in small change
  • The Indonesian court ordered its staff to count the money

SOLO, Indonesia: An Indonesian civil servant who owed his ex-wife a large alimony has paid back some $10,000 worth of missed payments — in coins.
Dwi Susilarto arrived at court on Thursday hauling a dozen sacks filled with 153 million rupiah ($10,500) in small change, a hefty payment that weighed in at about 890 kilograms (1,960 pounds), his lawyer said.
A fight nearly broke out between the man and his ex-wife’s lawyer, who refused to count the money transported in a wheelbarrow pushed by the 54-year-old and two friends.
Susilarto’s lawyer denied that his client was trying to insult ex-wife Hermi Setyowati.
The man’s low public service salary forced him to reach out to friends after the court in the town of Karanganyar in Central Java ordered him to pay back some nine years’ worth of unpaid alimony, said the lawyer Sutarto, who goes by one name.
“I was honestly surprised too (at the payment), but my client said the money was donated by friends and family who gave most of it to him in coins,” he said on Friday.
“There was no intention to insult anyone — that’s all he has.”
Setyowati, who eventually accepted the funds, wasn’t buying her former husband’s excuse.
“This is insulting — it’s like calling me poor,” she was quoted by local media as saying.
The court ordered its staff to count the money.


Stubbed out: Japan university stops hiring smoking professors

Updated 23 April 2019
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Stubbed out: Japan university stops hiring smoking professors

  • Nagasaki University the first state-run university to introduce such a condition of employment
  • Japan is steppiing up an anti-smoking campaign ahead of the 2020 Olympics

TOKYO: A Japanese university has stopped hiring professors and teachers who light up, officials said Tuesday, as the nation steps up an anti-smoking campaign ahead of the 2020 Olympics.
Nagasaki University spokesman Yusuke Takakura said they have “stopped hiring any teaching staff who smoke,” although applicants who promise to kick the habit before taking up their post could still be offered employment.
The university will also ban smoking entirely on campus from August, opening a clinic for those who cannot give up, said Takakura.
“We have reached a conclusion that smokers are not fit for the education sector,” the spokesman said, adding that the university had sought legal advice and does not believe the policy contravenes discrimination laws.
Local media said it was the first state-run university to introduce such a condition of employment and the move comes after Tokyo’s city government passed strict new anti-smoking rules last year ahead of the 2020 Summer Games.
Japan has long been an outlier in the developed world, considered a smoker’s paradise where lighting up is allowed in many restaurants and bars.
Tokyo’s new laws ban lighting up at restaurants in the capital, regardless of size. Restaurants can set up separate indoor smoking areas, but customers cannot eat or drink there.
Smoking is also banned entirely on school premises from kindergartens to high schools, although space can be set aside outside university and hospital buildings.
The World Health Organization has given Japan its lowest rating for efforts to prevent passive smoking, and it even scores poorly in the region compared with countries like China and South Korea.
Despite that, tobacco use in Japan has been falling in line with a broader global trend.