Turkey calls US ‘wild wolves’, vows to abandon dollar in trade

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Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan speaks during the opening ceremony for the newly built Serahsi Mosque in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, Sunday, Sept. 2, 2018. (Presidential Press Service via AP)
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Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, left, and Kyrgyzstan President Sooronbay Jeenbekov, shake hands during the opening ceremony for the newly built Serahsi Mosque in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, Sunday, Sept. 2, 2018. (Presidential Press Service via AP)
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Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, center left, and Kyrgyzstan President Sooronbay Jeenbekov, right, speak during the opening ceremony for the newly built Serahsi Mosque in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, Sunday, Sept. 2, 2018. (Presidential Press Service via AP)
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Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, left, and Kyrgyzstan President Sooronbay Jeenbekov, right, greet each other after they both received honorary doctorates from Manas University in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, Sunday, Sept. 2, 2018. (Presidential Press Service via AP)
Updated 02 September 2018
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Turkey calls US ‘wild wolves’, vows to abandon dollar in trade

BISHKEK: Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Sunday vowed Ankara would pursue non-dollar transactions in trade with Russia and other countries, accusing the US of behaving like “wild wolves.”
Both Turkey and Russia are reeling from punitive economic measures imposed by Washington.
“America behaves like wild wolves. Don’t believe them,” Erdogan told a business forum during a visit to Kyrgyzstan, in comments translated into Kyrgyz.
He said his country was in negotiations with Russia over non-dollar trade.
“Using the dollar only damages us. We will not give up. We will be victorious,” Erdogan told the meeting, attended by Kyrgyz and Turkish businessmen as well as government officials.
Ties between NATO members Washington and Ankara hit a new low last month as US President Donald Trump announced steep new tariffs on Turkish steel and aluminum in response to the detention of an American pastor in Turkey.
The Turkish lira shed a quarter of its value last month as the trade war with the US ratcheted up.
Russia meanwhile saw its ruble tumble to two-year lows in August after the US announced fresh sanctions in connection with a nerve agent poisoning incident in the British city of Salisbury.
Erdogan has also used the visit to ex-Soviet Kyrgyzstan to demand the Central Asian country of six million people relinquish all ties to Fethullah Gulen, a US-based cleric and educator Ankara accuses of fomenting a coup in 2016.
Speaking Sunday, Erdogan said Turkish businesses should invest in Kyrgyzstan but “may face barriers from FETO,” the term Ankara uses to describe the network of people and institutions linked to Gulen.
The refusal of the United States to extradite 77-year-old Gulen to face trial in Turkey is one of several sore points that have plagued a once-strong bilateral relationship.
Gulen, whose Hizmet movement has led to the creation of schools in dozens of countries including Kyrgyzstan has always denied any links to the 2016 coup attempt.
Since July 2016, over 55,000 people have been arrested over coup links in Turkey, while more than 140,000 public sector employees have been sacked or suspended.


Libya confirms it rescued 87 migrants in Mediterranean

Updated 2 min 37 sec ago
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Libya confirms it rescued 87 migrants in Mediterranean

  • Friday’s statement from the navy says the Libyan coast guards found a sinking rubber boat whose bottom had collapsed on Thursday
  • It says the migrants — Arab and African nationals — were handed over to Libyan police after receiving humanitarian and medical aid

CAIRO: Libya’s navy has confirmed it rescued 87 Europe-bound migrants, including six women and a child, off the country’s Mediterranean coast, following a video released by a German aid group about the disaster.
Friday’s statement from the navy says the Libyan coast guards found a sinking rubber boat whose bottom had collapsed on Thursday, leaving most migrants in the water and hanging onto what was left of the boat and plastic barrels.
It says the migrants — Arab and African nationals — were handed over to Libyan police after receiving humanitarian and medical aid.
Earlier, German group Sea-Watch said its aircraft had filmed three rescue operations by Libyan coast guards on Thursday.
Humanitarian groups object to returning migrants to lawless Libya, citing reports of abuse, beatings and other inhuman treatment.