MoU signed to preserve Saudi heritage

Saudi Arabia first started registering sites when the government approved the registration of three sites on the UNESCO World Heritage list in 2006. (SPA)
Updated 03 September 2018
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MoU signed to preserve Saudi heritage

  • The General Culture Authority’s role is to preserve, protect, enrich and promote the Kingdom’s cultural sector

JEDDAH: The General Culture Authority has signed a memorandum of understanding with the Saudi Heritage Preservation Society in Riyadh to enhance cooperation in support of the intangible cultural heritage sector in the Kingdom.
The memorandum was signed by the Executive Chairman of the General Culture Authority, Engineer Ahmed bin Fahd Al-Mazyad and the Director General of the Saudi Heritage Preservation Society Abdulrahman bin Abdullah Al-Eidan.
Engineer Al-Mazyad said that the signing of this memorandum comes from the keenness of the Authority to build a meaningful and fruitful partnership with the Society aiming at providing all services that will contribute to documenting elements of intangible cultural heritage in a number of regions in the Kingdom and the elements of intangible cultural heritage of files of UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).
The General Culture Authority’s role is to preserve, protect, enrich and promote the Kingdom’s cultural sector, nurturing cultural talent, supporting cultural diversity and Saudi identity through the arts. It seeks to enhance the cultural standing of the Kingdom by extending bridges and opening channels of communication regionally and globally, contributing to the development of a vibrant society, in line with Saudi Arabia’s Vision 2030.


Saudi Arabia’s nuclear program ‘fundamental to Kingdom’s energy sector’

Updated 18 September 2018
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Saudi Arabia’s nuclear program ‘fundamental to Kingdom’s energy sector’

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia’s atomic energy program is fundamental for developing a sustainable energy sector, a senior minister told the International Atomic Energy Agency on Monday.
The Kingdom plans to start building its first two nuclear power reactors this year and as many as 16 over the next 25 years at a cost of more than $80 billion. The plan is to provide 15 percent of Saudi Arabia’s power from nuclear by 2032.
Speaking at the IAEA’s annual conference in Vienna, Energy Minister Khalid Al-Falih said the atomic reactor projects were were part of the Kingdom’s Vision 2030 to diversify its energy sources to nuclear and renewables.
The program “abides by all international treaties and conventions and best practices, adhering to the highest standards of safety, security and transparency,” Al Falih said.
The minister said Saudi Arabia was committed to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, which calls for nuclear disarmament and stresses the commitment of nuclear power states to share their peaceful technologies with abiding member states.
He also said the Kingdom had called for cooperation with the international community to make the Middle East a nuclear weapons free area.
The US has started to reintroduce heavy sanctions against Iran over its nuclear program, after Donald Trump pulled out of a deal with the country earlier this year to curb its atomic ambitions.
Al-Falih called on the international community to take a more stringent stance against all threats to regional and international security, particularly Iran, given its “alarming efforts to build its nuclear capabilities, in tandem with its increasing acts of sabotage and aggression against other states in the region.”