Houthis and Hezbollah ‘trafficking drugs to fund military operations’

Col. Turki Al-Maliki, spokesman for the Arab coalition, speaks to media. (SPA)
Updated 04 September 2018
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Houthis and Hezbollah ‘trafficking drugs to fund military operations’

  • Yemeni security forces in Marib governorate confiscated a shipment of drugs coming from Lebanon

“Houthi militias have been trafficking drugs, which the Yemeni security forces with the support of the coalition have been fighting to stop,” said Col. Turki Al-Maliki, spokesman for the Saudi-led Arab coalition at a press conference in Riyadh on Monday.
The spokesman accused the Houthis of being drug traffickers in cooperation with the Lebanese Hezbollah group.
Al-Maliki said that coalition forces were helping Yemen’s legitimate security forces to counter the Houthi drug trade. He added that many drug shipments had been seized and that some of the seized shipments had the slogan “Beirut Youth Council.”
“This explains the relationship between Hezbollah and the Houthi militias in an effort to find sources of funding for military operations,” he said.
“Al-Houthi militias continue to threaten maritime navigation in the Strait of Bab Al-Mandeb and the Red Sea.”
Yemeni security forces in Marib governorate confiscated a shipment of drugs coming from Lebanon, on its way to the Houthi militias in the capital Sanaa, according to the Yemeni Information Ministry.
On Thursday, the Yemeni minister of Information Mouammar Al-Aryani said on his Twitter account that the seized drug shipment was hidden inside coffee packets.
Al-Maliki said that Iranian-backed Houthi militias are using schools in Taiz district to avoid the Saudi-led coalition’s targeting.
The coalition said that it accepts the results of the investigation of the Joint Incident Assessment Team (JIAT) following an attack on a bus last month that killed dozens.


Christchurch Muslims praise King Salman’s Hajj offer

Updated 19 July 2019
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Christchurch Muslims praise King Salman’s Hajj offer

  • The president of the Muslim Association of Canterbury Shagaf Khan said people will be both financially and spiritually supported during the journey
  • Khan said a trip to Makkah would normally cost around 10,000 New Zealand dollars ($6,769), but King Salman’s offer would cover pilgrims “from the time they leave their house and come back”

CHRISTCHURCH: King Salman’s Hajj offer to host families of those affected by March’s Christchurch terror attacks is “something really special,” said the president of the Muslim Association of Canterbury, Shagaf Khan.
The Saudi king has offered to host and cover the expenses of 200 Hajj pilgrims when they journey to Makkah this year.
Khan said people will be both financially and spiritually supported during the journey. “For some of them, it’ll be a great comfort feeling like they’ve fulfilled the obligations of being a Muslim,” he added.
Khan said a trip to Makkah would normally cost around 10,000 New Zealand dollars ($6,769), but King Salman’s offer would cover pilgrims “from the time they leave their house and come back.”
When asked what the offer would mean for Canterbury’s Muslim community, Khan said it is part of the solidarity and support that has been shown to them since the Christchurch terror attacks, which claimed the lives of 51 people.
“Four months on … people still feel supported and they feel they’re still being remembered,” he added.
Sheikh Mohammed Amir, who is working closely with the local community, Saudi Arabia’s Embassy and its Ministry of Islamic Affairs to implement King Salman’s offer, said it will be available for those who had lost family members or been injured in the mosque attacks.
Canterbury’s Muslims are “very appreciative” of the offer, added Amir, who is chairman of the Islamic Scholars Board of New Zealand.
“I’ll say with full confidence that this will be a big relief for the deceased’s families, for the victims, for all those who’ve been injured and affected,” he said.
When asked how the organization of the pilgrimage is going, Amir said “so far, so good,” but added that it has been challenging without official records to track everyone down.
He said it is an honor and a responsibility to help organize the pilgrimage, which he has been helping to plan since the end of Ramadan. “People are very excited about it,” he added.
He said he believed that the king’s offer had been made to help people’s rehabilitation after the terror attacks.
“The community believes he’s going to contribute in building Christchurch and bringing people to a normal life,” Amir added.