Rihanna heads to the UAE for a beauty masterclass

Singer, businesswoman Rihanna will visit Dubai to host her first ever Fenty Beauty Artistry & Beauty Talk on Sept. 29
Updated 05 September 2018
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Rihanna heads to the UAE for a beauty masterclass

  • Rihanna will be in the UAE for first Fenty Beauty Artistry & Beauty Talk make up class in Dubai
  • Venue is yet to be confirmed, but tickets are available starting Sept. 10

DUBAI: Barbadian pop legend Rihanna is asking for just two hours of your time to teach you how to do your make-up — Fenty style.

As the founder of Fenty Beauty, named by Time magazine as the Best Innovation of 2017, the 30-year-old singer and businesswoman heads to the UAE on Sept. 29 for her first masterclass in makeup, billed at $1,497 per session.

The venue for the one-day event has yet to be finalized, with tickets available for purchase from 2 p.m. on Thursday.

This is not Rihanna’s first venture into the Middle East — Fenty Beauty flooded Saudi Arabia with its products in April this year. 

In the UAE, the event has been co-sponsored by Sephora. Proceeds from the event will go to Dubai Cares, a charitable organization that works with UN aid agencies and international NGOs in an effort to improve children’s access to education in developing countries.

For her part, uses the proceeds from Fenty Beauty beauty line towards charitable causes that benefit underprivileged girls across the world, especially in Africa and the Caribbean.

The star’s announcement comes fresh off the back of recent controversy surrounding her new eyeshadow palette “Moroccan Spice.”

In July, detractors accused her of cultural appropriation over a collection of 16 eyeshadow shades with names such as “Fez up,” “Desert baked” and “Shisha smoke.”

The palette’s desert-themed video featured models posing next to a camel with Arab-influenced music playing in the background.

However, some social media commenters slammed the campaign for not using Moroccan models. “Moroccan Spice with no Moroccan models to represent it. If Rihanna was white, her brand would be tarnished from the backlash she’d receive for this Orientalist nonsense,” a twitter user had said at the time.

Others took umbrage to the fact that the video was shot in the US, instead of Morocco.

Talking about the inclusive nature of her beauty products Rihanna had said that “Fenty Beauty was created for women of all shades, personalities, attitudes, cultures and race.

“I wanted everyone to feel included, that’s the real reason I made this line,” the singer, with a supposed net worth of $245 million, said. 

The artist’s association with Saudi Arabia is not limited to her makeup line. She is reportedly dating billionaire Saudi businessman Hassan Jameel. The pair have yet to confirm their alleged romance, however.


Book review: ‘Where the Bird Disappeared’ is a tale as old as time

Updated 22 September 2018
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Book review: ‘Where the Bird Disappeared’ is a tale as old as time

CHICAGO: Taking a leaf from the real-life stories of Prophet Zakariyya and his son Yahya, Palestinian poet and writer Ghassan Zaqtan’s “Where the Bird Disappeared” is a beautiful yet haunting novel set in the village of Zakariyya, in modern-day Palestine.
Inspired by Qur’anic stories and political history, the novel talks about the relationship between Zakariyya and his best friend Yahya who not only share their names with the two prophets but bear a distant resemblance to their personalities and fates as well.
Zaqtan’s narrative is lyrical, heartbreaking and profound. Rooted in Palestine — a land that stood the test of time and would go on to become the hub of early and modern civilizations — the story is captivating enough to transport us to the hideaway monastery in Nuba Karam or the vineyards of Beit Jalla, the new homes for several villagers forced into exile.
Recalling the devastation and violence faced by those migrating from their homes and country, Zaqtan’s ability to take his readers through the same mountain paths and into the soul of his characters is a cause for applause. As Zaqtan writes of his central character, Zakariyya, “he felt he was walking inside a book, stumbling inside stories that had circulated in these hills since his birth. Journeys and names repeating themselves in succession without end.” And while the novel succeeds in digging deep into the annals of history, it also makes the reader realize how much impact the land of Palestine has had on the two characters and the various stories generating from the region.
Zaqtan’s tale is gentle enough to etch out images of each village, street or ancient structure that make the story and yet devastating enough that these get lost in the bigger picture. His brilliance lies in how conscious he is about the words used, while never losing sight of the historical context of his narrative or the love of the central characters for their beloved land.
Ghassan Zaqtan is an award-winning Palestinian poet, novelist, and playwright. He first published “Where the Bird Disappeared” in Arabic in 2015. It was then translated into English by Samuel Wilder and published by Seagull Books in 2018.