23 injured after Saudi Arabian forces intercept Houthi missile fired toward Najran

Saudi Arabia's air defense forces intercepted a missile fired by Houthi militia on Wednesday toward Najran. (Screenshot)
Updated 06 September 2018
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23 injured after Saudi Arabian forces intercept Houthi missile fired toward Najran

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia’s air defense forces on Wednesday intercepted a ballistic missile fired by Houthi militias, which injured 23 people according to an Arab coalition statement.

The missile, the latest in a series of similar attacks, was heading toward Najran, the Saudi Press Agency reported.

Arab coalition spokesman Col. Turki Al-Maliki said that 23 people were injured by "falling scattered fragments" as a result of the incident but none of the injuries were serious.

Al-Maliki added that the launching of missiles by the Iranian-backed Houthi militia proves the Iranian regime’s continued involvement in supporting the terrorist group in clear and explicit defiance of UN resolution 2216 and resolution 2231.

He noted the Houthi attacks are aimed at threatening the Kingdom’s security, as well as regional and international security and the firing of ballistic missiles at populated towns and villages is in contradiction of international humanitarian law.

The total number of ballistic missiles launched by the Iranian-backed Houthi militia toward Saudi Arabia so far has reached 187 rockets.


Christchurch Muslims praise King Salman’s Hajj offer

Updated 19 July 2019
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Christchurch Muslims praise King Salman’s Hajj offer

  • The president of the Muslim Association of Canterbury Shagaf Khan said people will be both financially and spiritually supported during the journey
  • Khan said a trip to Makkah would normally cost around 10,000 New Zealand dollars ($6,769), but King Salman’s offer would cover pilgrims “from the time they leave their house and come back”

CHRISTCHURCH: King Salman’s Hajj offer to host families of those affected by March’s Christchurch terror attacks is “something really special,” said the president of the Muslim Association of Canterbury, Shagaf Khan.
The Saudi king has offered to host and cover the expenses of 200 Hajj pilgrims when they journey to Makkah this year.
Khan said people will be both financially and spiritually supported during the journey. “For some of them, it’ll be a great comfort feeling like they’ve fulfilled the obligations of being a Muslim,” he added.
Khan said a trip to Makkah would normally cost around 10,000 New Zealand dollars ($6,769), but King Salman’s offer would cover pilgrims “from the time they leave their house and come back.”
When asked what the offer would mean for Canterbury’s Muslim community, Khan said it is part of the solidarity and support that has been shown to them since the Christchurch terror attacks, which claimed the lives of 51 people.
“Four months on … people still feel supported and they feel they’re still being remembered,” he added.
Sheikh Mohammed Amir, who is working closely with the local community, Saudi Arabia’s Embassy and its Ministry of Islamic Affairs to implement King Salman’s offer, said it will be available for those who had lost family members or been injured in the mosque attacks.
Canterbury’s Muslims are “very appreciative” of the offer, added Amir, who is chairman of the Islamic Scholars Board of New Zealand.
“I’ll say with full confidence that this will be a big relief for the deceased’s families, for the victims, for all those who’ve been injured and affected,” he said.
When asked how the organization of the pilgrimage is going, Amir said “so far, so good,” but added that it has been challenging without official records to track everyone down.
He said it is an honor and a responsibility to help organize the pilgrimage, which he has been helping to plan since the end of Ramadan. “People are very excited about it,” he added.
He said he believed that the king’s offer had been made to help people’s rehabilitation after the terror attacks.
“The community believes he’s going to contribute in building Christchurch and bringing people to a normal life,” Amir added.