Suspected US drone strike kills 4 Al-Qaeda members in Yemen

US troops operate a drone during a desert warfare exercise. A suspected US drone strike has killed four alleged Al-Qaeda militants including a field leader in southern Yemen, tribal leaders said on Sept. 9, 2018. (Shutterstock photo)
Updated 10 September 2018

Suspected US drone strike kills 4 Al-Qaeda members in Yemen

SANAA, Yemen: Yemeni tribal leaders say a suspected US drone strike has killed four alleged Al-Qaeda militants including a field leader in the country’s south.
The tribal leaders said on Sunday that the operatives were killed when an unmanned aircraft targeted a group of Al-Qaeda militants in the district of Ahwar, one of Al-Qaeda’s strongholds in the southern Abyan province.
They spoke on condition of anonymity for fear of reprisals.
Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, as the Yemeni affiliate is known, has long been considered the global network’s most dangerous branch and has attempted to carry out attacks inside the US
Yemen was plunged into civil war more than three years ago. Al-Qaeda and the Islamic State affiliate have exploited the chaos to expand their presence in the country.


Libyan navy says more than 300 migrants rescued

Updated 18 August 2019

Libyan navy says more than 300 migrants rescued

  • 128 Sudanese were in the boats, in addition to migrants from Chad, Egypt, Niger, Benin and Eritrea
  • It came days after Libyan navy patrols “rescued 278 migrants on board four inflatable boats

TRIPOLI: The Libyan navy said Sunday 335 migrants had been rescued and one body recovered in separate operations off the coast, as they tried to cross the Mediterranean to reach Europe.
Nine children were among 57 migrants in a wooden boat rescued Saturday about 40 nautical miles from the town of Zuwara, west of Tripoli, navy spokesman General Ayoub Kacem told AFP.
He said they were from Ethiopia and Egypt.
It came days after Libyan navy patrols on Tuesday “rescued 278 migrants on board four inflatable boats northwest and northeast of Tripoli,” Kacem added.
The operations took place off the coasts of the cities of Khoms, 120 kilometers (75 miles) east of Tripoli, and Sabratha, located 70 kilometers west of the capital.
According to the statement, 128 Sudanese were in the boats, in addition to migrants from Chad, Egypt, Niger, Benin and Eritrea, including 35 women and 11 children.
One body was also recovered by the coast guard.
Libya, which has been wracked by chaos since the 2011 uprising that killed dictator Muammar Qaddafi, has long been a major transit route for migrants, especially from sub-Saharan Africa.
In general, migrants rescued at sea are first met by humanitarian agencies that provide medical care and food.
They are then taken into the charge of the body working to combat immigration at the interior ministry of the UN-recognized Government of National Accord.
On August 9, the Libyan navy accused the authorities of failing to manage migrants rescued at sea, claiming that it could be forced to let people go free once brought back to land.
Despite the risks, migrants continue to attempt to reach Europe by sea, preferring to take their chances than stay in Libya, where they are subject to abuse, extortion and torture, according to humanitarian organizations.