Iran opens new consulate in Iraq’s Basra after attack

Iraqi Counter-Terrorism Services (CTS) members secure the street close to the Basra International Hotel where Iraqi Prime Minister Haider Al-Abadi stays in Basra. (AFP)
Updated 12 September 2018
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Iran opens new consulate in Iraq’s Basra after attack

BASRA: Iran’s ambassador to Iraq opened a new consulate for his country in the southern city of Basra on Tuesday, four days after its old mission building was torched by protesters.
Basra has seen a surge in deadly protests in the past week, with demonstrators angry about poor public services setting alight several key buildings.
“I’m here to inaugurate the new premises of our Iranian consulate in Basra... because we don’t want lose a single day of services for the people of Basra,” said ambassador Iraj Masjedi.
The envoy was speaking at a news conference before the Iranian flag was hoisted outside the building now operating as the Islamic republic’s consulate in the city.
Iran is one of two major powers present in neighboring Iraq, along with the United States.
Many pilgrims from Iran are expected to travel to Iraq in around 10 days for the Ashura rituals and in October for the Arbaeen commemorations.
The Iranian consulate building in Basra was torched by demonstrators on Friday, with its documents and equipment going up in smoke. None of its staff were injured.
Iran said the responsibility for any negligence over the incident lies with the Iraqi government, which announced an investigation into the security forces responsible for protecting the mission.


Saudi Arabia, Kuwait slam UN for human rights report on Yemen

Updated 7 min 27 sec ago
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Saudi Arabia, Kuwait slam UN for human rights report on Yemen

  • Kuwait’s permanent delegate to the UN said that the report was “deeply flawed”
  • Saudi Arabia’s ambassador to the UN also said the report has come away from “objectivity and characterized by haste”

DUBAI: Saudi Arabia and Kuwait on Wednesday slammed a report prepared by United Nations experts over alleged human rights violations in Yemen.

Kuwait’s permanent delegate to the UN, Ambassador Jamal Al-Ghunaim told the 39th session of the UN Human Rights Council that the report was “deeply flawed.”

“[The report] seems to hurl false accusations at the Saudi-led Coalition,” Al-Ghunaim said.

He said the UN experts singled out the coalition of Arab states fighting Yemen’s Iran-allied Houthi militia as accountable for the human rights violations in the war-torn country.

“The Arab Coalition never ceased to cooperate with the UN specialists in Yemen to ensure that civilian casualties are averted,” he said.

The Kuwaiti diplomat went on to give the Arab coalition credit for their “efforts to restore normalcy and hope to the lives of the Yemeni people.”

Saudi Arabia’s ambassador to the UN, Abdulaziz Al-Waselthe, also said the report has come away from “objectivity and characterized by haste” in drawing conclusions and came full of errors in its approach and contents.

In a speech to the Human Rights Council, A-Waselthe said that the report ignored the information provided to the group of experts by the concerning agencies in the Arab Coalition.

The Kuwaiti envoy condemned the Houthis’ acts of aggression that violates international humanitarian laws.