Al-Jazeera distances itself from Khashoggi death claims, blames Reuters

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Saudi investigators arrived in Istanbul on Saturday to participate in the investigation into the disappearance of Kamal Khashoggi. (AP)
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Screengrab of deleted tweets from Al-Jazeera's official Twitter account.
Updated 08 October 2018
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Al-Jazeera distances itself from Khashoggi death claims, blames Reuters

LONDON: Qatari broadcaster Al-Jazeera has distanced itself from a news item speculating that Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi was murdered while visiting the Saudi consulate in Turkey.

Al-Jazeera Arabic, which had repeated the Reuters story extensively, has acknowledged the claims to be unverified and instead blamed newswire Reuters for the information.

The Reuters story cited only Turkish sources without naming them or providing any substantial evidence to support Khashoggi’s death claims.

Contrary to what it had previously reported, an Al-Jazeera reporter appeared live to say: “I talked to his fiancée 15 minutes ago and she is saying that all Turkish officials who were communicating with her, stopped talking to her and updating her. Turkish officials are no longer answering our calls. 

“No Turkish media mentioned the Reuters news regarding Khashoggi. The story regarding dismembering and killing Khashoggi was only featured on Reuters and AFP. 

The official Turkish Anadolu agency has only mentioned the arrival of officials (Saudi) and then this morning it quoted Reuters news about the death of Khashoggi.”

Al-Jazeera is owned directly by the Qatari government. Saudi Arabia and other members of the anti-terror quartet (UAE, Bahrain and Egypt) have cut off relations and imposed a boycott of Qatar since last year, accusing the Gulf nation of supporting terror and meddling in internal affairs. 

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan earlier said he was hopeful about the missing Saudi journalist.

 

 

 


Google Doodle serves up falafel in quirky animation

Updated 18 June 2019
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Google Doodle serves up falafel in quirky animation

  • It is believed falafels originated in Egypt, where they were called ta’ameya and made of fava beans
  • The popularity of falafel then moved towards the Levant area, where the use of chickpea became a staple

DUBAI: One of the Middle East’s favorite dishes has been featured in a Google Doodle as the site apparently took a break from the Women’s World Cup.

Google had been running a series of doodles about the major sporting event, but on Tuesday – apparently randomly - focused on what the search giant described as the “best thing that ever happened to chickpeas.”

We don’t know why they chose Tuesday to run the Doodle – June 12 having been International Falafel Day.  

But the Middle East’s claim to these mouthwatering balls of chickpeas, onions, herbs and spices is undeniable.

Here's a simple step-by-step guide to making falafels, posted by food blog Food Wishes:

It is believed falafels originated in Egypt, where they were called ta’ameya and made of fava beans, about a thousand years ago, by Coptic Christians who ate them during lent as a meat substitute.

Another version of the story suggests that it goes further back to Pharaonic times – traces of fava beans were said to be found in the tombs of the Pharaohs, according to website Egyptian Streets, and that there were paintings from ancient Egypt showing people making the food.

The popularity of falafel then moved towards the Levant area, where the use of chickpea became a staple.

Over the years, many variations of falafel were invented, with global fast food chain McDonalds joining in the falafel craze with its McFalafel.

Popular Iraqi-American comedian Remy Munasifi, attracted more than 1.5 million views for a song about falafels he posted on his YouTube account “GoRemy.’