Saudi Arabia says it will respond to any action taken against it with a ‘greater reaction’

Updated 14 October 2018

Saudi Arabia says it will respond to any action taken against it with a ‘greater reaction’

  • Kingdom's statement says it is an important part of the world economy
  • Any action, sanctions or otherwise, will be met with "greater action"

Saudi Arabia said on Sunday that it rejects any threats and attempts to undermine it, and would respond with “greater action” to any sanctions or action taken against the Kingdom, state news agency SPA has reported.

The statement went on to say: “Whether by waving economic sanctions, using political pressure, or repeating false accusations that will undermine the Kingdom.”

“The government and the people are steadfast, dear as ever, no matter what the circumstances and whatever the pressure is.”

It said that if action was taken against the Kingdom “it will respond with greater action.”

The statement added: “The Kingdom’s economy has an influential and vital role in the global economy.”

This is the statement in full:

An official source stated that the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and from its leading position in the Arab and Islamic worlds has played a prominent role throughout history in achieving security, stability and prosperity of the region and the world, leading efforts in combating extremism and terrorism, enhancing economic cooperation and consolidating peace and stability in the region and the world and it is still working with brotherly and friendly countries to promote these goals, basing all of this on its own status as a platform of revelation, and the birthplace of Islam.

The kingdom affirms its total rejection of any threats and attempts to undermine it, whether by threatening to impose economic sanctions, using political pressures, or repeating false accusations that will not undermine the Kingdom and its staunch positions and Arab, Islamic and international status, the outcome of these weak endeavors, like their predecessors, is a demise.

The Kingdom as the government and people are steadfast, glorious as ever, no matter whatever the pressures and circumstances might be.

The Kingdom also affirms that if it receives any action, it will respond with greater action, and that the Kingdom's economy has an influential and vital role in the global economy and that the Kingdom's economy is affected only by the impact of the global economy.

The Kingdom appreciates the brothers’ stand in the face of the campaign of false allegations and falsehoods, as well as it appreciates the voices of the wise people around the world, who have overcome wisdom, deliberation and the search for truth instead of rushing and seeking to exploit rumors and accusations to achieve goals and agendas unrelated to the search for truth.


Malaysia’s poverty levels far higher than reported, UN expert says

Updated 34 sec ago

Malaysia’s poverty levels far higher than reported, UN expert says

  • Malaysia’s official poverty rate dropped to 0.4% in 2016
  • Independent groups said the actual poverty rate is 15%
KUALA LUMPUR: A UN human rights expert on Friday disputed Malaysia’s assertion that it has nearly eliminated poverty, saying that official figures were vastly inaccurate and do not reflect realities on the ground.
Malaysia’s official poverty rate dropped from 49% in 1970 to just 0.4% in 2016.
But Philip Alston, UN special rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights, said the official numbers relied on outdated measures, with the poverty line remaining at the same level for decades despite increasingly high costs of living.
Analyzes done by independent groups suggest that Malaysia has “significant poverty” and that its true poverty rate was about 15%, Alston said.
“The government’s official figures would make it the world champion in eliminating poverty ... but I think it’s pretty obvious that that’s not the case,” Alston told a news conference at the end of an 11-day visit to Malaysia.
The prime minister’s office and finance ministry did not immediately respond to a request for comment on Alston’s assertion.
Alston said the national poverty line of $234.00 per household per month was “ridiculous,” as it would mean an urban family of four would have to survive on 8 ringgit, or less than $2, per person per day.
“It can’t be done except under really dire circumstances,” he said.
Undercounting the poverty rate has led to a lack of effective government policies targeting the problem, with too many underfunded and ineffective programs in place, Alston said.
He urged Malaysia to reassess its methods for measuring poverty and take into account vulnerable groups excluded from the data such as stateless families, migrant workers, and refugees
“Only then can Malaysia begin devising policies that can systematically address their needs,” he said.