The Six: Traditional natural remedies from the Middle East

A sprig of thyme. (Shutterstock)
Updated 15 October 2018
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The Six: Traditional natural remedies from the Middle East

  • We take a look at natural remedies stemming from the Middle East
  • From turmeric to thyme, these home remedies are used across the Arab world and beyond

DUBAI: Natural remedies have long been used in the Arab world to treat a range of health issues, including these seeds and herbs that are thought to have various benefits.

Black cumin seed
According to Islamic tradition, the black cumin seed is a powerhouse of health benefits. It is thought to help with immune-related, digestive and respiratory issues and has antihistamine, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties.

Cloves
Cloves and clove oil have been used in dentistry since the 19th century due to the presence of the antiseptic and anti-inflammatory chemical eugenol.

Turmeric
Turmeric contains the chemical curcumin that is thought to decrease inflammation in the body.

Thyme
Thyme has been used for centuries to treat such complaints as diarrhea, stomach ache, arthritis and sore throats due to the presence of thymol, an antiseptic agent.

Fennel seeds
A concentrated source of minerals like copper, potassium, calcium, zinc, manganese, vitamin c, iron, selenium and magnesium, fennel is thought to do everything from regulate blood pressure to ease water retention as it’s a known diuretic.

Anise
Anise oil contains thymol, terpineol and anethole, which are thought to help with cough and flu cases. Anise is also thought to help improve digestion, alleviate cramps and reduce nausea.


US issues health alert on romaine lettuce

In this file photo taken on May 2, 2018, Romaine lettuce is displayed at a grocery store in San Anselmo, California. (AFP)
Updated 21 November 2018
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US issues health alert on romaine lettuce

  • Health officials in Canada said they had also identified 18 people stricken with the same strain of food poisoning in two provinces, Ontario and Quebec

WASHINGTON: US health officials warned consumers Tuesday not to eat any romaine lettuce and to throw away any they might have in their homes, citing an outbreak of E. coli poisoning.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued the warning against all Romaine lettuce just two days before the Thanksgiving holiday, when American families gather and feast together.
“Consumers who have any type of romaine lettuce in their home should not eat it and should throw it away, even if some of it was eaten and no one has gotten sick,” the CDC said, after 32 people were reported sick from E. coli poisoning in 11 states, with 13 of them hospitalized. One of those had suffered kidney failure.
Health officials in Canada said they had also identified 18 people stricken with the same strain of food poisoning in two provinces, Ontario and Quebec.
“This advice includes all types or uses of romaine lettuce, such as whole heads of romaine, hearts of romaine, and bags and boxes of precut lettuce and salad mixes that contain romaine, including baby romaine, spring mix, and Caesar salad,” the CDC said, noting that it had not been able to pinpoint precisely where the suspect leaves had originated.
“If you do not know if the lettuce is romaine or whether a salad mix contains romaine, do not eat it and throw it away,” the CDC said.
It advised anyone who had stored romaine lettuce in their refrigerator to wash down the shelves where the leaves had been kept.
No deaths have so far been reported.