Phase two development of Libya’s Bahr Essalam gas field to finish by end 2018: NOC

The development of the gas field is a joint venture between Libya’s National Oil Company and Eni. (File/AFP)
Updated 04 November 2018
0

Phase two development of Libya’s Bahr Essalam gas field to finish by end 2018: NOC

  • At a meeting in the Libyan capital, Tripoli, Sanalla and Descalzi discussed plans for seven remaining wells

CAIRO: Seven remaining wells are expected to be online at Libya’s Bahr Essalam offshore gas field by the end of the year, the Libyan National Oil Corporation (NOC) said in a statement on Sunday.
The statement came after a meeting between NOC Chairman Mustafa Sanalla and Eni CEO Claudio Descalzi. The field is operated by Mellitah Oil and Gas, a joint venture between the NOC and Eni.
The first wells in phase two of the development of Bahr Essalam came online in July.
At a meeting in the Libyan capital, Tripoli, Sanalla and Descalzi discussed plans for seven remaining wells, which the statement said were “expected to complete by the end of 2018.”
“The parties discussed opportunities to increase production, investment and exploration, and the importance of sustainability in all activities,” the statement added.
“The compression capacity upgrade project at the Wafa plant was also reviewed, with the first gas expected to come on stream in the next few days; a successful joint project in challenging conditions in Libya’s remote interior.”


Huawei warns US patent curbs would hurt global tech

Updated 27 June 2019
0

Huawei warns US patent curbs would hurt global tech

  • US senator’s proposal comes amid mounting American action against Huawei
  • Huawei’s US sales of network gear evaporated after a congressional panel labeled the company a security threat in 2012

SHENZHEN, China: Chinese tech giant Huawei warned Thursday a US senator’s proposal to block the company from pursuing damages in patent courts would be a “catastrophe for global innovation.”
The proposal comes amid mounting US action against Huawei, the biggest maker of switching gear for phone carriers, amid tension over Beijing’s technology ambitions. The company has been devastated by the Trump administration’s decision to impose restrictions on its access to American chips for smartphones and other components and technology.
Disrupting Huawei’s access to US patent courts would threaten the intellectual property system that supports technology development, said Song Liping, the company’s chief legal officer.
The proposal by Sen. Marco Rubio, a Republican from Florida, followed reports Huawei Technologies Ltd. is asking for $1 billion from American phone carrier Verizon for use of the Chinese company’s patents.
“If such a legislative proposal were to be passed, it would be a catastrophe for global innovation. It would have terrible consequences,” Song said at a news conference. He said it would “break the foundation of IP protection.”
American officials accuse Huawei of facilitating Chinese spying, a charge the company denies, and see it as a growing competitive threat to US technology industries.
Huawei’s founder, Ren Zhengfei, said this month it has cut its project sales by $30 billion over the next two years due to curbs on access to American chips and other components. He said smartphone sales outside China will fall 40 percent.
Huawei’s US sales of network gear evaporated after a congressional panel labeled the company a security threat in 2012 and told phone carriers to avoid it. But the Chinese company has a patent portfolio it licenses to manufacturers and carriers.
Song gave no confirmation of how much Huawei wants from Verizon or the basis of its claims.
“Intellectual property litigations are matters that should be heard and ruled on by courts. They should not be politicized,” he said.
Huawei, founded in 1986, has China’s biggest corporate research and development budget at $15 billion in 2018. The company is a leader in developing next-generation telecoms technology.
On Wednesday, a US federal court jury in Texas ruled Huawei stole trade secrets from a Silicon Valley company but awarded no damages, saying the Chinese company didn’t benefit.
The jury rejected Huawei’s claims that Cnex Labs Inc. co-founder Yiren Huang stole its technology while he worked at a Huawei subsidiary.
Huawei’s head of intellectual property, Jason Ding, said the company was studying the verdict and deciding what to do next.
Asked about a report by Bloomberg News that some Huawei researchers had published papers with Chinese military personnel over the past decade, Song said the company wasn’t aware of its employees publishing research as private individuals.
“We don’t customize products or do research for the military,” said Song. “We are not aware of employees publishing papers. We don’t have projects of that kind.”