Louis Farrakhan, in Iran, warns Trump a Mideast war possible

Louis Farrakhan, the leader of the Nation of Islam, is long known for provocative comments and is widely considered anti-Semitic. (File/AFP)
Updated 08 November 2018
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Louis Farrakhan, in Iran, warns Trump a Mideast war possible

DUBAI, UAE: Minister Louis Farrakhan, the leader of the Nation of Islam, is warning President Donald Trump not to pull “the trigger of war in the Middle East . at the insistence of Israel.”
His remarks came during a visit to Iran where Farrakhan spoke to journalists in Tehran on Thursday.
The 85-year-old Farrakhan, long known for provocative comments widely considered anti-Semitic, criticized the economic sanctions leveled by Trump against Iran after he pulled America from the nuclear deal between Tehran and world powers.
Farrakhan says he’s “begging our president and the government that supports him to be very, very careful.”
He said: “The war will trigger another kind of war which will bring China, Russia, all of the nations into a war. The war will end America as you know it.”


Erdogan rejects European court’s ‘non-binding’ decision over pro-Kurdish leader

Updated 10 min 10 sec ago
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Erdogan rejects European court’s ‘non-binding’ decision over pro-Kurdish leader

  • “The decisions delivered by the ECHR do not bind us”
  • The court said the reasons given for keeping him behind bars were not “sufficient”

ANKARA: Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Tuesday rejected a decision by the Strasbourg-based European Court of Human Rights calling for the release of pro-Kurdish leader Selahattin Demirtas.
“The decisions delivered by the ECHR do not bind us,” Erdogan was quoted as saying by the state-run Anadolu news agency.
The European Court of Human Rights on Tuesday called on Turkey to release pro-Kurdish leader Selahattin Demirtas, saying his detention since 2016 on terror charges was aimed at “stifling pluralism.”
Demirtas, one of two former co-leaders of the leftist pro-Kurdish Peoples’ Democratic Party (HDP), was arrested in November 2016 over his alleged links to Kurdish militants.
At the time of his arrest he was a member of parliament.
The court in the French city of Strasbourg said it accepted that Demirtas had been arrested on “reasonable suspicion” of committing a crime, but said the reasons given for keeping him behind bars were not “sufficient” and constituted “an unjustified interference with the free expression of the opinion of the people.”
It found that the extension of his detention, particularly during a referendum on expanding President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s powers and later a presidential election, were aimed at “stifling pluralism and limiting freedom of political debate, which was at the very core of the concept of a democratic society.”
“The court therefore held, unanimously, that the respondent state was to take all necessary measures to put an end to the applicant’s pre-trial detention,” it added.
The ECHR hears cases of alleged violations of the European Convention on Human Rights of which Turkey is a signatory.

(With AFP)