Saudi Arabia calls for end to Israeli occupation of Palestinian territories

Dr. AbdulAziz Al-Rukabi, adviser to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs stressed that Saudi Arabia’s position on the Palestinian issue was firm and unwavering. (AFP)
Updated 09 November 2018
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Saudi Arabia calls for end to Israeli occupation of Palestinian territories

  • A UN resolution emphasizes the principle of the permanent sovereignty of peoples under occupation over their natural resources

DUBAI: Saudi Arabia has welcomed today’s resolution titled: The Permanent sovereignty of the Palestinian people in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and of the Arab population in the occupied Syrian Golan over their natural resources.
The resolution emphasizes the principle of the permanent sovereignty of peoples under occupation over their natural resources. It also sheds light on the exploitation of the Israeli occupation of natural resources on the Palestinian territories and other Arab territories occupied by Israel since 1967.
During the 73rd session of the United Nations General Assembly, Dr. AbdulAziz Al-Rukabi, adviser to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs said in his speech: “The Kingdom calls upon all countries of the world to be rational and respect the values and humanitarian principles of the United Nations and it urges them to unanimously endorse this important resolution, in order to end the long-term suffering of the Palestinian people that engendered many tragedies and disasters that went beyond the Palestinian people and reached the villages, lands, farms, fields, Islamic sanctity and every living creature.”
Rukabi pointed out that the Israeli occupation was tyrannical and despotic; the settlement projects and the burning of agricultural lands by the settlers, have expanded in a blatant manner that defies all international treaties and norms. It is time for these manipulative actions to stop, and it is time to respect and abide by human rights. The establishment of an independent Palestinian state with Jerusalem as its capital has become the best strategic choice to ensure peace in the region.
He also stressed that Saudi Arabia’s position on the Palestinian issue was firm and unwavering, rejecting Israeli policies that do not respect international laws and norms. He also called for ending the Israeli occupation and finding a comprehensive, lasting and fair solution based on the two-state solution and establishing an independent State of Palestine as of June 4, 1967, having Jerusalem as its capital.


Latest Gaza flare-up: What does it mean for the blockaded strip?

This cease-fire, like others before it, is fragile and could easily be derailed. (AFP)
Updated 18 November 2018
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Latest Gaza flare-up: What does it mean for the blockaded strip?

  • “Unfortunately aggression against the Palestinian people will continue.”
  • Israel and Hamas have fought three wars in Gaza since 2008

AFP JERUSALEM: A truce in Gaza has left Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu battling to keep his government afloat after Defense Minister Avigdor Lieberman walked out in protest.

Hamas, which rules the Gaza Strip, welcomed Lieberman’s resignation on Wednesday as a “victory” — but what will it mean for Gaza?

Israel and Hamas have fought three wars in Gaza since 2008, interspersed with simmering hostilities and periodic spikes in violence.

Hamas refuses to recognize Israel. The Jewish state, like the US and the EU, defines Hamas as a “terrorist” organization. For over a decade Israel has maintained a crippling blockade on the coastal strip.

An apparently botched Israeli army raid into the Gaza Strip triggered the worst escalation in violence since 2014 and brought the two sides to the brink of war.

On Tuesday, Hamas and Israel accepted an Egyptian-mediated cease-fire. Denouncing it as “capitulation,” Lieberman resigned from his post the next day, leaving the government with a majority of just one seat in Parliament.

Hamas and Islamic Jihad declared the cease-fire with military powerhouse Israel “a political victory.”

It came after Israel in October allowed Qatar to provide Gaza with fuel to help ease its chronic electricity crisis, under a UN-brokered deal.

In parallel, Egypt and the UN have been seeking to broker a long-term Gaza-Israel truce in exchange for Israel easing its embargo.

The events of the past week gave a boost to Hamas and its allies, said Gaza political analyst Mukhaimer Abu Saada. “But if there is a war that could change,” he said.

After the pounding Gaza took in 2014, most residents want above all to avoid a rerun. Indirect contacts between Israel and Hamas have eroded the status of the Palestinian Authority (PA).

A peace initiative by US President Donald Trump is expected to emerge in the next few months. The PA fears that it will drive the wedge even deeper between Gaza the West Bank, two territories long envisaged as part of a unified Palestinian state.

Jamal Al-Fadi, a professor of political science in Gaza, says such a divide suits Israel. “We can not have results against Israel except by unity,” he said.

This cease-fire, like others before it, is fragile and could easily be derailed.

With the Israeli political tensions unleashed by Lieberman’s departure, there will be fresh domestic pressure on Netanyahu to hit Hamas harder.

“The coming days will be difficult” for Gaza, Al-Fadi said.

“It was a right-wing government and the (next) elections will bring another right-wing government,” he said.

“Unfortunately aggression against the Palestinian people will continue.”