Meet the Saudi Arabian businessman shaping squash’s Olympic dream

Ziad Al-Turki is the Chairman of the Professional Squash Association (PSA) and has done wonders in marketing the game and broadening its appeal. (Twitter: PSA)
Updated 14 November 2018
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Meet the Saudi Arabian businessman shaping squash’s Olympic dream

LONDON: A Saudi Arabian businessman is driving the bid to get squash included in the Olympics for the first time.
The World Squash Federation has petitioned three times for squash to join the Games, but each bid has been rejected by the International Olympic Committee (IOC). The decision has prompted frustration in the squash community, particularly as sports such as climbing, surfing and skateboarding have been admitted.
Ziad Al-Turki is the Chairman of the Professional Squash Association (PSA) and has done wonders in marketing the game and broadening its appeal. He is now pushing hard for the game to be showcased on the biggest stage of all at the 2024 Olympics Games in Paris.
Squash has huge global appeal, with the men’s singles final in the last Commonwealth Games attracting a TV audience of more than one million.
“Everyone’s ultimate goal is the Olympics,” said Al-Turki. “The main push comes from the World Squash Federation (WSF) and for many years they were stuck in their ways. We changed a lot at the PSA and ticked every box with the IOC. The WSF just stayed stagnant and didn’t do anything. They didn’t want to put our hand in their hand and work together.”
Relations between the PSA and the WSF came to a head in 2015 in the wake of squash losing out to wrestling for a spot at the 2020 Olympics. A statement from the PSA described the then president of WSF, Narayana Ramachandran, as an “embarrassment to the sport.”
“Nothing could happen with the president of the WSF. Nothing would change. It was just a one-man show. We tried to help but he wouldn’t accept any help,” Al-Turki said. “We have a new president now and they are all very keen,” he added.
Jacques Fontaine is the new president and at his coronation in 2016 he encouragingly said “the Olympic agenda remains a priority.”
“The WSF love the sport and they understand the needs of the IOC,” said Al-Turki.
“They understand the PSA is at a completely different level to the WSF and we’ve now joined forces and are working together. Hopefully 2024 will be the year squash is in the Olympics. Right now, the way we are working together is the strongest collaboration ever and hopefully we can tick all the boxes for the IOC.
“We ticked all the right bodies as a professional association but the WSF didn’t. Now they are putting their hands in ours and we will tick all the right boxes for the ICO.”
Al-Turki, once described as the Bernie Ecclestone of squash, has certainly transformed the sport since he took up office in 2008.
“When I joined the PSA we didn’t have any media coverage,” he said. “Right now we are live in 154 countries. the women’s tour has just grown stronger and stronger — the income has gone up by 74 percent.
“I just love the squash players. I think they are incredible athletes are are some of the fittest athletes in the world. I felt they deserved better and I wanted them to have better.
“I don’t think we’ll be able to reach the levels of football and tennis in terms of exposure and prize money, but I want to reach a level where they will retire comfortably. It’s one of the fastest growing sports in the world right now.
“It’s all about the player and their well being. Nick Matthew retired recently and I think he’s retired comfortably. I think I’ve contributed to this as the income has improved. That’s all I want – nothing more.”


Saudi Arabia’s Young Falcons go down to France in opening U-20 World Cup match

Updated 25 May 2019
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Saudi Arabia’s Young Falcons go down to France in opening U-20 World Cup match

  • Saudi Arabia’s next game in the tournament is against Mali on Tuesday
  • The U-20 Green Falcons are making their ninth appearance at the event

GDYNIA, Poland: Saudi Arabia’s U-20 World Cup campaign got off to a faltering start on Saturday as the young Green Falcons lost 2-0 to France at the Stadion GOSiR in Gdynia, Poland.
Khaled Al-Atwi’s young guns made the worst possible start as they went down to ten men when Faraj Al-Ghashayan was given his marching orders after just 12 minutes.
However, France labored for their first goal as the Green Falcons stayed resolute in defense. But with two minutes of the first period remaining Strasbourg player Youssouf Fofana, who had come on for the injured Boubakary Soumare midway through the first half, found the net to break the deadlock.
The man advantage was clear for all to see in the second half as Saudi Arabia struggled to make an impact on the match. And France extended their advantage with fifteen minutes left when Lyon’s Amine Gouiri scored to take the game away from Al-Atwi’s side.
Saudi Arabia’s next game in the tournament is against Mali on Tuesday. The African side opened their tournament with a 1-1 draw against Saudi Arabia's other Group E opponents Panama.
The U-20 Green Falcons are making their ninth appearance at the World Cup. In 2017’s edition in South Korea, they were knocked out at the Round of 16 stage by Uruguay, while the Kingdom hosted the event in 1989.