Shh...! South Korea hushes for crucial university entrance exam

This year nearly 595,000 students are sitting the grueling national university entrance exam, which stretches over nine hours. (AP)
Updated 15 November 2018
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Shh...! South Korea hushes for crucial university entrance exam

  • This year nearly 595,000 students are sitting the grueling exam, which stretches over nine hours
  • The results of the daunting exam will be released on December 5

SEOUL: South Korea dialed down the volume on Thursday as hundreds of thousands of students sat a crucial national university entrance exam, with authorities taking extraordinary measures to minimize possible distractions.
The college entrance test is the culmination of South Korea’s highly demanding school system, and in an ultra-competitive society it plays a large part in defining students’ adult lives, holding the key to top universities, elevated social status, good jobs, and even marriage prospects.
This year nearly 595,000 students were sitting the grueling exam, which stretches over nine hours, according to the education ministry.
South Korean President Moon Jae-in, who was in Singapore for regional summits, posted a good luck message to the students on his Facebook page.
The intense effort they had put in over years of study was coming to fruition, he said. “Believe in it and you will be able to show your full competence.”
Extraordinary measures are taken nationwide to remove anything that could disturb the test-takers.
Public offices, major businesses and the stock market opened an hour later than usual to help ease traffic and ensure students arrived on time for the exam, which began nationwide at 8:40am.
Any students stuck in traffic could get police cars and motorbikes to rush them to the exam centers.
All takeoffs and landings at South Korean airports are suspended for 25 minutes to coincide with an English listening test, and all airborne planes must maintain an altitude higher than 3,000 meters (10,000 feet).
The Transport Ministry said 134 flights had to be rescheduled because of the exam.
Electronics are strictly forbidden and students cannot leave school premises until the test ends to reduce the chances of cheating.
But they will be allowed to wear masks during the exam this year, the education ministry said, with fine dust pollution levels persisting at “bad” on the peninsula.
The results of the daunting exam will be released on December 5.


Jordan gets its first female boots on Everest summit

Updated 26 May 2019
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Jordan gets its first female boots on Everest summit

  • Dubai-based mountaineer Dolores Shelleh also became first Arab woman to scale the world’s highest mountain from its northern side
  • Shelleh previously summited Mount Manaslu, the eighth highest mountain in the world, as well as Europe’s highest peak, Mount Elbrus, and Africa’s highest peak, Mount Kilimanjaro

DUBAI: Dubai-based mountaineer Dolores Shelleh became the first Jordanian woman to scale mount Everest this week, as well as being the first Arab woman to scale the world’s highest mountain from its northern side.

“By scaling Mt. Everest from the North Col, I intended to highlight the message of embracing more sustainable practices and to promote the use of renewable energy as well as reinforce the need to follow healthy lifestyles in harmony with nature,” Shelleh said.

“The challenge I undertook was particularly arduous as the North Col of Mt. Everest route called for more technical climbing and the weather conditions were windier and chillier. With the support and blessings of my family, friends and my co-residents in The Sustainable City, I was able to accomplish the task,” she added.

Shelleh’s climb was sponsored by The Sustainable City, the Middle East’s first fully operational sustainable community, found in the UAE.

Shelleh previously summited Mount Manaslu, the eighth highest mountain in the world, as well as Europe’s highest peak, Mount Elbrus, and Africa’s highest peak, Mount Kilimanjaro.