Meet the Saudi designer using music to spark innovation

Al Johara Beydoun taught participants how to translate music into design. (Image supplied)
Updated 18 November 2018
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Meet the Saudi designer using music to spark innovation

DUBAI: The fourth edition of Dubai Design Week wrapped up on Saturday, but not before innovative Saudi designer Al Johara Beydoun held a workshop on how to translate music into design.
Armed with a BA in interior design and an MA in urban design, Beydoun is the founder of Ink; — a Jeddah-based multidisciplinary design studio that merges art, design and science with a focus on urban design, architecture, interiors and furniture design.
Beydoun hosted Saturday’s class, which was held as part of Dubai Design Week’s 230 events.

Al Johara Beydoun. (Photo courtesy: Muhummad Bajniad) 


“The workshop aims to teach participants a new method of translating music into design and utilizing music as a concept generator tool,” she told Arab News before her session.
“Workshop participants will learn the process of creating a space inspired by the emotional journey a musical piece can evoke… participates will learn how to reflect, fragment and formulate a design from concept to a result,” she added.
Beydoun expanded further on what it means to be a good designer and the importance of seeking inspiration from a wide array of sources.
“To be a good designer is to be a good storyteller. We create design solutions based on visual stories and we create with a blend of art, science, mathematics and literature,” she said of her Saudi Arabia-based studio.
As one of only a handful of Saudi designers taking part in the fair, Beydoun recognized the inherent opportunity to fly the flag for her home country.

Participants were taught how to use music as a tool. (Image supplied)


“It’s important to show the world what Saudi Arabia has to offer. I believe that there are many talents that need to be in the spotlight and showcased, hence why I chose to participate in Dubai Design Week. In such events, we are not only showcasing our talent… but also the beauty of our beliefs and identity.”


Archaeologists find mosque from when Islam arrived in holy land

Updated 18 July 2019
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Archaeologists find mosque from when Islam arrived in holy land

  • Authorities estimate the mosquer dates back to the 7th to 8th centuries
  • Rare to find house of prayer so ancient whose congregation is likely to have been local farmers

RAHAT, Israel: Archaeologists in Israel have discovered the remains of one of the world’s oldest rural mosques, built around the time Islam arrived in the holy land, they said on Thursday.
The Israel Antiquities Authority estimates that the mosque, uncovered ahead of new construction in the Bedouin town of Rahat in the Negev desert, dates back to the 7th to 8th centuries.
There are large mosques known to be from that period in Jerusalem and in Makkah but it is rare to find a house of prayer so ancient whose congregation is likely to have been local farmers, the antiquities authority said.
Excavated at the site were the remains of an open-air mosque — a rectangular building, about the size of a single-car garage, with a prayer niche facing south toward Makkah.
“This is one of the earliest mosques known from the beginning of the arrival of Islam in Israel, after the Arab conquest of 636 C.E.,” said Gideon Avni of the antiquities authority.
“The discovery of the village and the mosque in its vicinity are a significant contribution to the study of the history of the country during this turbulent period.”