Putin and Erdogan in Turkey to mark key phase in pipeline

Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan and his Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin arrive to attend a ceremony to mark the completion of the sea part of the TurkStream gas pipeline in Istanbul. (Reuters)
Updated 19 November 2018
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Putin and Erdogan in Turkey to mark key phase in pipeline

  • The two leaders are marking the completion of the offshore part of TurkStream’s two lines
  • Turkey relies on imports for its energy needs and Russia is its top supplier for natural gas

ISTANBUL: Russian President Vladimir Putin and Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan are in Istanbul to mark the completion of a key phase in a natural gas pipeline.
The two leaders on Monday are marking the completion of the offshore part of TurkStream’s two lines that will carry natural gas from Russia to Turkey.
The lines when finished are expected to supply Russian gas to European markets through Turkish territories. Together the two 930-kilometer (578-mile) lines via the Black Sea will carry 31.5 billion cubic meters (1.1 trillion cubic feet) of natural gas annually.
Turkey relies on imports for its energy needs and Russia is its top supplier for natural gas. It bought 28 billion cubic meters last year. That gas is currently transported through another line under the Black Sea and the onshore West Line through Ukraine, which is mired in conflict with Russia.


Protesters, police scuffle in anti-tax protests in Jordan

Updated 14 December 2018
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Protesters, police scuffle in anti-tax protests in Jordan

  • The police fired several rounds of tear gas, as protesters dropped to the ground in coughing fits
  • Jordan’s economy has been hit by the fallout from years of conflict in neighboring Syria and Iraq

AMMAN, Jordan: Hundreds of people have protested in Jordan’s capital against the government’s planned tax increases and high youth unemployment.
Some protesters near the prime minister’s office scuffled with riot police who fired several rounds of tear gas. Several people dropped to the ground in coughing fits.
It marked the first time police and protesters clashed since regular Thursday night protests resumed several weeks ago.
Previous demonstrations in the spring forced the resignation of then-Prime Minister Hani Mulki who was replaced by economist Omar Razzaz.
Razzaz promised a more inclusive style of governing, but is also under pressure from international lenders to cut the government’s large deficit.
Jordan’s economy has been hit by the fallout from years of conflict in neighboring Syria and Iraq, including trade disruptions and an influx of refugees.