Somber celebration of the 50th anniversary of Egyptian cathedral

The 200 icons inside the church are a major attractions for tourists and history students. (Photo/Supplied)
Updated 20 November 2018
0

Somber celebration of the 50th anniversary of Egyptian cathedral

  • The windows will tell stories of the martyrs of Alexandria, Tanta and other regions

CAIRO: Egypt celebrated the 50th anniversary of the Cathedral of St. Mark in Abbasia, Cairo, with a mass prayer headed by Pope Tawadros II.
However, the mood was somber because Egypt’s Copts are still grieving over the attack on them in Upper Egypt on Nov. 2, in which seven people died and more than 20 others were injured.
“Fifty years ago was a historic and proud day in this cathedral and in Egypt as we celebrated the opening of this cathedral in the presence of President Gamal Abdel Nasser, Pope Cyril VI (the 116th Pope in the history of the Church) and Emperor Haile Selassie,” said the pope in a sermon. “The emperor of Ethiopia opened this cathedral in 1968 and named it St. Mark after the foundation stone was laid in 1965. It was the largest cathedral in the Middle East.
“Today, we share with the bishops, priests, ladies and children of Sunday schools, a day of joy and celebration.
“Four years ago, we started the architectural development and renovation of the cathedral. Hundreds of engineers, technicians, workers and a large number of companies participated and did a great job. It would have been great to have a celebration to mark the 50th anniversary of the cathedral and to honor the renovation workers, but the circumstances have not allowed it. However, I thank them.”
The pope pointed out that in the church there are about 200 icons (a painting that tells a story), adding that “the icons in the spiritual sense are windows on the sky, each inviting us to heaven.
“The windows will tell stories of the martyrs of Alexandria, Tanta and other regions. There will be an icon to let the community know of his Holiness Pope Kyrolos VI and there will be many others. We will issue a detailed book on all icons.”
The event was broadcast by many media outlets. Director Rida Shawqi said in an exclusive interview with Arab News that Egyptian television used all the facilities and capabilities to convey the celebration of the inauguration of the Cathedral of St. Mark, including 18 cameras which were inside the cathedral as well as drones and the national TV cameras.
According to scholar of Coptic studies Majid Kamel, the architects of the cathedral were engineers Awad Kamel, former dean of the faculty of fine arts at Cairo University, and Salim Kamel Fahmi. They were awarded the job after winning a drawing and design competition that was announced by the patriarchate, and chosen by the committee as the best project among 35 architectural offices. The project was completed in three years. He added that “construction works involved 700 technical workers, 300 builders and 1,000 construction workers. Construction costs amounted to about 350,000 Egyptian pounds ($19,490) — a lot in 1968. Owing to the high cost, the Egyptian Patriarchate launched a fundraising campaign to complete the works. President Abdel Nasser donated 150,000 Egyptian pounds from the national fund to help completion.
A small booklet distributed to attendees of the event explained that the cathedral building is 144 meters long, about 61 meters wide, and has one dome and two lamps, which is in the Egyptian architectural style. It also said that this was the headquarters of the Pope of Alexandria from its inception until now, following the old headquarters in the Church of Alexandria in Azbekiya (central Cairo).
The patriarchal church, adjacent to the cathedral, was attacked on Dec. 11, 2016, killing 29 people and wounding 31. In addition to severe damage to the Church of the Patriarchs, some of the buildings surrounding the cathedral were also damaged. Daesh claimed responsibility for the incident.


Iran's foreign minister walks back from remark on missile talks

Updated 22 min 33 sec ago
0

Iran's foreign minister walks back from remark on missile talks

  • Mohammad Javad Zarif said in an interview with NBC News that if the US wants to talk about Iran's missiles, it needs "first to stop selling all these weapons, including missiles, to our region"
  • A compromise deal remains the best way to prevent Iran acquiring a nuclear weapon, British Prime Minister Theresa May said on Wednesday

TEHRAN: Iran's foreign minister said Wednesday that his country has no choice but to manufacture missiles for defense purposes — comments that reflect more backtracking after a remark by the top diplomat suggesting the missiles could be up for negotiations.
Mohammad Javad Zarif said in an interview with NBC News that aired earlier this week that if the US wants to talk about Iran's missiles, it needs "first to stop selling all these weapons, including missiles, to our region."
Iran has long rejected negotiations over its ballistic missile program, which remains under the control of the Iranian paramilitary Revolutionary Guard that answers only to Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.
The foreign minister's remarks suggested a possible opening for talks as tensions remain high between Tehran and Washington.
But the Iranian mission to the United Nations promptly called Zarif's suggestion purely "hypothetical" and said the Iranian missiles were "absolutely and under no condition negotiable with anyone or any country, period."
In Tehran, the Foreign Ministry's spokesman, Abbas Mousavi, tweeted late on Tuesday that Zarif's comments meant to challenge Washington and "threw the ball into the US court while challenging America's arm sales" to its Mideast allies.
Zarif himself on Wednesday backpedaled on the missiles issue, saying Iran has no choice but to manufacture the missiles for its own defense.
He cited the 1980s Iran-Iraq war and tweeted that, "For 8 YEARS, Saddam (Hussein) showered our cities with missiles & bombs provided by East & West. Meanwhile, NO ONE sold Iran any means of defense. We had no choice but building our own. Now they complain."
"Instead of skirting the issue, US must end arms sales to Saddam's reincarnations," Zarif also said.
Tensions between Tehran and Washington have sharply escalated since President Donald Trump unilaterally last year withdrew America from the nuclear deal between Tehran and world powers and re-imposed sanctions on Iran, sending its economy into freefall.
America has also rushed thousands of additional troops, an aircraft carrier, nuclear-capable B-52 bombers and advanced fighter jets to the Mideast amid unspecified threats from Iran.
Mysterious oil tanker blasts near the Strait of Hormuz, attacks by Iranian-backed rebels in Yemen on Saudi Arabia and Iran's shooting down of a U.S. military drone in the past months further raised fears of a wider conflict engulfing a region crucial to global energy supplies.

A compromise deal remains the best way to prevent Iran acquiring a nuclear weapon, British Prime Minister Theresa May said on Wednesday.

The UN nuclear watchdog has confirmed that Iran earlier this month violated the 2015 accord, and Iran's supreme leader on Tuesday said Tehran would keep removing restraints on its nuclear activity in the deal.

In her last major speech before stepping down next week, May said the nuclear deal must be protected "whatever its challenges".

"Whether we like it or not a compromise deal remains the best way to get the outcome we all still ultimately seek – to prevent Iran from acquiring a nuclear weapon, and to preserve the stability of the region," May said.

Recently, British authorities intercepted the Iranian supertanker Grace 1, carrying 2.1 million barrels of light crude oil, and seized it with the help of British Royal Marines off the coast of Gibraltar.
They believed it to be violating European Union sanctions by carrying a shipment of Iranian crude oil to Syria. Spanish authorities said the seizure came at the request of the United States.
This is not the only issue between Iran and Britain.
Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, a British-Iranian woman imprisoned in Iran following her arrest in April 2016 on charges of plotting against the Iranian government, has been transferred to a hospital mental health facility, her husband said Wednesday.
Her family denies the allegations against her.
Her husband, Richard Ratcliffe, said in Britain that his wife has been moved to the mental health ward of Iman Khomeini hospital under the control of the Revolutionary Guard.
"Hopefully her transfer to hospital means that she is getting treatment and care, despite my distrust of just what pressures can happen behind closed doors. It is unnerving when we don't know what is going on," he said.
Iran does not recognize dual nationality.
British officials have urged Iranian officials to let her have contact with her family.