Egypt unveils previously unopened ancient female sarcophagus in Luxor

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Egyptian workers and archaeologists standing next to an opened intact sarcophagus containing a well-preserved mummy of a woman named “Thuya” wrapped in linen, discovered by a French mission at the site of Tomb TT33 which dates to the 18th dynasty (16th-13th century BC) at Al-Assasif necropolis on the west bank of the Nile north of the southern Egyptian city of Luxor. (AFP)
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A view of an opened intact Egyptian sarcophagus containing a well-preserved mummy of a woman named “Thuya” wrapped in linen, discovered by a French mission at the site of Tomb TT33 which dates to the 18th dynasty (16th-13th century BC) at Al-Assasif necropolis on the west bank of the Nile north of the southern Egyptian city of Luxor. (AFP)
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A group of mummies stacked together at the site of Tomb TT28, which was discovered by an Egyptian archaelogical mission at Al-Assasif necropolis on the west bank of the Nile north of the southern Egyptian city of Luxor. (AFP)
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Statuettes are arranged outside a newly discovered tomb at Al-Assasif Necropolis in Luxor, Egypt November 24, 2018. (Reuters)
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An Egyptian archaeologist brushes the painted walls of Tomb TT28, which originally dated to the Middle Kingdom (21st-18th century BC) but was reused the Late period (7th-4th century BC), which was discovered by an Egyptian archaelogical mission at Al-Assasif necropolis on the west bank of the Nile north of the southern Egyptian city of Luxor. (AFP)
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Carved wooden statues and funerary figurines called “Ushabtis” made of wood, faience and clay laid out on a table, discovered by an Egyptian archaelogical mission at tomb TT28 at Al-Assasif necropolis on the west bank of the Nile north of the southern Egyptian city of Luxor. (AFP)
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A group of mummies stacked together at the site of Tomb TT28, which was discovered by an Egyptian archaelogical mission at Al-Assasif necropolis on the west bank of the Nile north of the southern Egyptian city of Luxor. (AFP)
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Egyptian workers and archaeologists standing next to an intact sarcophagus containing a well-preserved mummy of a woman named “Thuya” wrapped in linen, discovered by a French mission at the site of Tomb TT33 which dates to the 18th dynasty (16th-13th century BC) at Al-Assasif necropolis on the west bank of the Nile north of the southern Egyptian city of Luxor. (AFP)
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Egypt’s Antiquities Minister Khaled El-Enany (3d L), French Professor Frederic Colin (L) head of the French mission, and Mostafa Waziri, Secretary General of the Supreme Council of Antiquities (2nd L), attend the unveiling of an intact sarcophagus inside the tomb TT33 in Luxor, Egypt November 24, 2018. (Reuters)
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An Egyptian worker standing next to an opened intact sarcophagus containing a well-preserved mummy of a woman named “Thuya” wrapped in linen, discovered by a French mission at the site of Tomb TT33 which dates to the 18th dynasty (16th-13th century BC) at the site of Tomb TT33 at Al-Assasif necropolis on the west bank of the Nile north of the southern Egyptian city of Luxor. (AFP)
Updated 24 November 2018
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Egypt unveils previously unopened ancient female sarcophagus in Luxor

LUXOR, Egypt: Egyptian authorities on Saturday unveiled a well-preserved mummy of a woman inside a previously unopened coffin in Luxor in southern Egypt dating back to more than 3,000 years.
The sarcophagus, an ancient coffin, was one of two found earlier this month by a French-led mission in the northern area of El-Asasef, a necropolis on the western bank of the Nile. The first one had been opened earlier and examined by Egyptian antiquities officials.
“One sarcophagus was rishi-style, which dates back to the 17th dynasty, while the other sarcophagus was from the 18th dynasty,” Minister of Antiquities Khaled Al Anani said. “The two tombs were present with their mummies inside.”

Egypt's Antiquities Minister Khaled El-Enany (L), French Professor Frederic Colin (2nd L) head of the French mission, and Mostafa Waziri, Secretary General of the Supreme Council of Antiquities (C), attend the unveiling of an intact sarcophagus inside the tomb TT33 in Luxor. (Reuters)

The Eighteenth Dynasty dates back to the 13th century BC, a period noted for some of the most well known Pharaohs, including Tutankhamen and Ramses II.
It was the first known time that authorities had opened a previously unopened sarcophagus before international media.
Earlier in the day, authorities also revealed in the same area the tomb of the overseer of the mummification shrine identified as Thaw-Irkhet-if.

Artefacts laid out on a table, discovered by an Egyptian archaelogical mission at tomb TT28 at Al-Assasif necropolis on the west bank of the Nile north of the southern Egyptian city of Luxor. Located between the royal tombs at the Valley of the Queens and the Valley of the Kings, the Al-Assasif necropolis is the burial site of nobles and senior officials close to the pharaohs. (AFP)

The tomb contained five colored masks and some 1,000 Ushabti statutes — the miniature figurine of servants to serve the dead in the afterlife.
Three-hundred meters of rubble were removed over five months to uncover the tomb, which contained colored ceiling paintings depicting the owner and his family.
The tomb, which also contains mummies, skeletons and skulls, dates back to the middle-kingdom almost 4,000 years ago, but was reused during the late period.

An archaeologist works on a sarcophagus inside a tomb at Al-Assasif Necropolis in Luxor, Egypt. (Reuters)

Ancient Egyptians mummified humans to preserve their bodies for the afterlife, while animal mummies were used as religious offerings.
Egypt has revealed over a dozen ancient discoveries since the beginning of this year.
The country hopes these discoveries will brighten its image abroad and revive interest among travelers who once flocked to its iconic pharaonic temples and pyramids but who have shunned the country since its 2011 political uprising.


The Six: Musicians in the UAE

Updated 17 February 2019
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The Six: Musicians in the UAE

DUBAI: It was an eventful weekend for music fans in the UAE, as numerous chart-toppers hit the stage in Dubai and Abu Dhabi.

Macklemore

Headlining RedFest DXB with Camila Cabello, this American rapper rose to fame in 2013 when his single “Thrift Shop” topped the US Billboard chart.

Afrojack

Also known as Nick Van de Wall, the Dutch DJ kicked off a weekend party at BASE Dubai, commanding a wild crowd with his best beats and tunes.

Jonas Blue

The English DJ, who has partnered with stars such as Zayn Malik, performed at RedFest due to a last-minute shakeup, replacing Jess Glynne, who had to pull out.

G-Eazy

This American rapper thoroughly enjoyed his stay in the UAE, sharing Instagram stories of the Burj Khalifa and views around Souk Madinat Jumeirah.

DJ Snake

The French DJ and producer, who rose to fame after partnering with Lady Gaga for her “Born This Way” album, was also on the bill in Dubai.

Arturo O’Farrill

This multi-Grammy winner Cuban musician serenaded the Abu Dhabi crowd on Valentine’s Day in an open-air evening of classic mambo, performing alongside the Afro-Latin Jazz Orchestra.