Royal Saudi Air Force carries out joint exercises with UK’s RAF

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A joint exercise between the Saudi Royal Air Force and the UK’s Royal Air Force — called ‘Saudi British Green Flag 2018’ — got underway this weekend at the King Fahad Air Base. (SPA)
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A joint exercise between the Saudi Royal Air Force and the UK’s Royal Air Force — called ‘Saudi British Green Flag 2018’ — got underway this weekend at the King Fahad Air Base. (SPA)
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A joint exercise between the Saudi Royal Air Force and the UK’s Royal Air Force — called ‘Saudi British Green Flag 2018’ — got underway this weekend at the King Fahad Air Base. (SPA)
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A joint exercise between the Saudi Royal Air Force and the UK’s Royal Air Force — called ‘Saudi British Green Flag 2018’ — got underway this weekend at the King Fahad Air Base. (SPA)
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A joint exercise between the Saudi Royal Air Force and the UK’s Royal Air Force — called ‘Saudi British Green Flag 2018’ — got underway this weekend at the King Fahad Air Base. (SPA)
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A joint exercise between the Saudi Royal Air Force and the UK’s Royal Air Force — called ‘Saudi British Green Flag 2018’ — got underway this weekend at the King Fahad Air Base. (SPA)
Updated 28 November 2018

Royal Saudi Air Force carries out joint exercises with UK’s RAF

JEDDAH: The Green Flag Exercise for 2018, carried out by the Saudi and British air forces, began on Sunday at King Fahd Air Base in Taif, and will continue through Dec. 11.
The exercise aims to improve the overall combat readiness of the Saudi Air Force and increase the capacities of crews and personnel through a series of training flights of varying complexity. It allows both forces to share technical knowledge and learn about how the other operates.

Maj. Gen. Haidar bin Rafie Al-Omari, commander of the air base and the exercise, said it is a critical part of this year’s training plan for the armed forces.
“The Green Flag Exercise involves all our air force combat systems supporting Operation Decisive Storm and Operation Restoring Hope (in Yemen),” he added. 
“The British Royal Air Force aims to integrate all combat systems, including air combat, air support and electronic warfare, and especially how to use them against the enemy’s land defense systems for maximum operational efficiency.”
Col. Khalid bin Yusuf Al-Yusuf, who is overseeing the exercise, said it covers a range of tactics such as electronic warfare, electronic jamming, ground forces support and avoiding land-based threats. 
“All these scenarios take place in a real combat environment, ensuring true-to-life conditions for best results,” he added.


Fraud alert over cryptocurrency falsely linked to Saudi Arabia

Updated 21 August 2019

Fraud alert over cryptocurrency falsely linked to Saudi Arabia

  • The website of a cryptocurrency company is promoting what it calls the CryptoRiyal and SmartRiyal
  • The Singapore-based company uses the Saudi emblem of two crossed swords and a palm tree

JEDDAH: Fraudsters are trying to lure victims into investing in a “virtual currency” with false claims that it is linked to the Saudi riyal and will be used to finance key projects, the Saudi Ministry of Finance warned on Tuesday.

The website of a cryptocurrency company in Singapore is promoting what it calls the CryptoRiyal and SmartRiyal, using the Saudi emblem of two crossed swords and a palm tree. Its “ultimate goal” is to finance NEOM, the smart city and tourist destination being built in the north of the Kingdom, the company claims.

“Any use of the KSA name, national currency or national emblem by any entity for virtual or digital currencies marketing will be subject to legal action by the competent authorities in the Kingdom,” the ministry said on Tuesday.

The fraudsters were exploiting ignorance of how virtual currencies work, cryptocurrency expert Dr. Assad Rizq told Arab News.

“A lot of tricks can be played,” he said. “Some of these companies are not regulated, they have no assets, and even their prospectus is sometimes copied from other projects.

“They hype and pump their project so the price goes up. Inexpert investors, afraid of missing out, jump in, which spikes the price even higher. Then the owners sell up and make tons of money.

“Cryptocurrencies are a risky investment for two reasons. First, the sector is not yet fully regulated and a lot of projects use fake names and identities, such as countries’ names or flags, to manipulate investors.

“Second, you have to do your homework, learn about the technology. And if you still want to invest, consider your country’s rules and regulations.”