Dubai summit’s stark warning to workers on tech takeover

Residents follow moves made by humanoid robot ‘Pepper’ during an afternoon exercise routine at Shin-tomi nursing home in Tokyo, Japan. (Reuters)
Updated 06 December 2018
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Dubai summit’s stark warning to workers on tech takeover

  • More than 100 leading technology and innovation specialists from across the world are taking part in Dubai Knowledge Summit
  • Etisalat’s Khalifa Hassan Al-Forah Al-Shamsi: Robots are going to rule the education and health sectors. We need professionals who are trained to cope with the technology pressure

DUBAI: Workforces will face a growing challenge in coming years coping with rapidly advancing technology and innovation, knowledge and innovation experts at a Dubai summit have warned.

Addressing a panel discussion at the Knowledge Summit, Khalifa Hassan Al-Forah Al-Shamsi, group chief corporate strategy and governance officer at Etisalat, said that the IoT (Internet of things) and AI (artificial intelligence) will play a greater role in future.

“Robots are going to rule the education and health sectors. We need professionals who are trained to cope with the technology pressure,” he said.

Sarfaraz Alam, chairman of TEXPO group of companies, said that in the near future the jobs of lawyers, doctors and pharmacists will vanish with robots taking their places.

“Those professions that have the ability to integrate, evolve and disrupt will survive. The rest will be replaced by AI and robots,” Alam said.

More than 100 leading technology and innovation specialists from across the world are taking part in the Knowledge Summit, which brings together prominent decision-makers, academics and pioneers from various sectors to explore best practice and propose answers to future challenges.

The summit, under the theme “Youth and the Future of the Knowledge Economy,” is an annual initiative of the Mohammed bin Rashid Al-Maktoum Knowledge Foundation.

Delivering an opening address at the two-day event, Dr. Boris Cizelj, president of the Knowledge Economy Network, said that innovations are reaching mass markets on an exponentially reducing timescale.

“The telephone took 50 years to reach a market of 50 million people; the mobile phone took 12 years, YouTube four, Facebook three and Twitter only two years. This really shows the acceleration of change — it is difficult to imagine it, but we have to adapt to it,” he said.

Dr. Simon Galpin, managing director of the Bahrain Economic Development Board, warned summit participants of a possible backlash against technology.

“If we focus only on technology, artificial intelligence and virtual reality, we won’t go anywhere. We need to encourage skills to keep our children human — skills such as creativity and interpersonal communication,” he said.


Australia says foreign government behind cyberattack on lawmakers

Australia's Prime Minister Scott Morrison. (AFP)
Updated 18 February 2019
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Australia says foreign government behind cyberattack on lawmakers

  • Morrison did not name any suspects, but analysts have said China, Russia and Iran were the most likely culprits

SYDNEY: A cyberattack on Australian lawmakers that breached the networks of major political parties was probably carried out by a foreign country, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said on Monday, without naming any suspects.
As Australia heads for an election due by May, lawmakers were told this month told to urgently change their passwords after the cyber intelligence agency detected an attack on the national parliament’s computer network.
The hackers breached the networks of Australia’s major political parties, Morrison said, as he issued an initial assessment by investigators.
“Our cyber experts believe that a sophisticated state actor is responsible for this malicious activity,” he told parliament.
“We also became aware that the networks of some political parties, Liberal, Labor and Nationals have also been affected.”
Morrison did not reveal what information was accessed, but he said there was no evidence of election interference.
Australians will return to the polls by May.
Morrison did not name any suspects, but analysts have said China, Russia and Iran were the most likely culprits.
“When you consider motivation, you would have to say that China is the leading suspect, while you wouldn’t rule out Russia either,” said Fergus Hanson, head of the International Cyber Policy Center at think-tank the Australian Strategic Policy Institute.
“It is the honey-pot of juicy political gossip that has been hoovered up. Emails showing everything from the dirty laundry of internal fights through to who supported a policy could be on display.”
Ties with China have deteriorated since 2017, after Canberra accused Beijing of meddling in its domestic affairs. Both countries have since sought to mend relations, but Australia remains wary of China.
Tension rose this month after Australia rescinded the visa of a prominent Chinese businessman, just months after barring Chinese telecoms giant Huawei Technologies from supplying equipment to its 5G broadband network.
Officers of Russia’s GRU military intelligence agency covertly monitored computers of US Democratic candidate, Hillary Clinton’s 2016 presidential campaign and campaign committees, and stole large amounts of data, US investigators have concluded.