Lack of funds hinder Saudi scale-ups

Saudi Arabia has had an underdeveloped private equity and venture capital market compared to other countries in the region and banks remain wary of lending to businesses. (Getty Images)
Updated 12 December 2018
0

Lack of funds hinder Saudi scale-ups

  • SMEs with proven business models that are on the verge of rapid growth often struggle due to a lack of financing options in the Kingdom
  • The Saudi government is offering entrepreneurs subsidized licenses to set up businesses as well as providing scale-ups with mentorship programs

LONDON: Small-to-medium-sized companies (SMEs) in Saudi Arabia looking to take the next step in the growth of their businesses often struggle due to a lack of funding options in the Kingdom, a report found.
Saudi Arabia has an underdeveloped private equity and venture capital market compared to other countries in the region and the banks remain wary of lending to these so-called “scale-up” businesses, according to research published on Tuesday by consultancy Strategy& and Endeavor — an entrepreneur mentorship provider based in New York.
Scale-ups are defined as SMEs with proven business models on the verge of a phase of rapid growth in revenue or staff numbers. Typically they account for 5 percent of a country’s SMEs, the report said.
Saudi Arabia was ranked “below average” on a “scale-up readiness” index compiled by the two consultancies that aim to assess how supportive the business environment is for smaller companies on the precipice of growth throughout the Middle East and North Africa.
The UAE was judged as the leading country in the region for scale-ups, according to the index.
Small scale-up firms in Saudi Arabia face a further challenge of attracting talent to work for them due to the reluctance of Saudi nationals to give up the healthy salaries and security of working for the public sector, the report said. This means these companies have to employ expensive expatriate employees.
The Kingdom is starting to improve the environment for scale-up businesses, said Mahmoud Makki, partner with Strategy&, Middle East. “The government of Saudi Arabia is pursuing reforms that aim to benefit scale-ups and catalyze the entire entrepreneurship ecosystem,” he said.
Reforms include the creation of a “one-stop-shop” portal to help entrepreneurs find out about regulations and how to launch new businesses.
The Saudi government is offering entrepreneurs subsidized licenses to set up businesses as well as providing scale-ups with mentorship programs. The Kingdom’s ministry of economy and planning is working on a new strategy called the “National Champions Program” that aims to help scale-up firms access export markets.
The research sets out recommendations for the region’s governments, advising them to help scale-ups access larger companies by subsidizing the purchase of goods from scale-ups.
Smaller businesses also need access to clear and transparent regulations and better technological infrastructure to bring down the costs of setting up.
“Focusing on scale-ups as a distinct segment with its unique needs will definitely create a more vibrant eco-system and accordingly expedite economic growth and the pace of innovation in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and the region,” said Amr Goussous, partner with PwC ME.


German firm wins mega order to build olive oil mill in Saudi Arabia

Updated 13 min 14 sec ago
0

German firm wins mega order to build olive oil mill in Saudi Arabia

  • Scope of project, located in Al-Jouf, expected to encompass 5 million olive trees
  • Saudi Arabia investing heavily in developing domestic food industry

Arab News LONDON: A German company has won an order to build a massive olive oil mill in Saudi Arabia that will be the largest in Asia.
GEA won the order from The National Agricultural Development Company (NADEC), one of the largest agricultural and food-processing companies in the Middle East.
The scope of the project, located in the region of Al-Jouf, is expected to encompass 5 million olive trees from a single farm of 3,000 hectares, GEA said in a statement on Tuesday.
“Once the construction process is completed, this facility will be largest and most modern olive oil mill in Asia,” said Rafael Cárdenas, head of the Center of Excellence for Olive Oil at GEA.
Gulf states including Saudi Arabia, the region’s largest economy, are investing heavily in developing their domestic food industries in an effort to reduce their reliance on imports and boost their food security.
The contract to build the Al-Jouf olive oil mill is the second phase of an ongoing project and will enlarge the existing olive oil plant that was built in 2016.
Al-Jouf Agriculture Development Company is the largest modern olive farm in the world.