Tunisian teachers demand better pay, protest work conditions

Striking teachers demonstrate with slogans reading "People wants education reforms" in Tunis, Wednesday, Dec. 19, 2018 during a so-called "day of anger". (AP)
Updated 19 December 2018
0

Tunisian teachers demand better pay, protest work conditions

  • Lassaad Yacoubi, a teachers’ union official, told the crowds “there are 500 schools without water or toilets"
  • Tensions between teachers’ unions and the governmenthave been affecting high school education

TUNIS, Tunisia: Tunisian high school teachers have taken to the streets of the capital to demand wage increases and improvements to what they call dire working conditions.
Thousands of protesters, many of them bused in from across the country, marched in Tunis on Wednesday, starting at the Education Ministry and finishing at the city’s main artery, Avenue Bourguiba.
Lassaad Yacoubi, a teachers’ union official, told the crowds “there are 500 schools without water or toilets and the roofs of many classrooms are dilapidated.”
Henda Ben Jemii, a teacher, wore a sign showing a schoolyard in Khaznadar, near Tunis, that was strewn with garbage.
Tensions between teachers’ unions and the government, which believes their wage demands are too high, have been affecting high school education in the North African nation for months.


Libyan militia declares ‘zero hour’ for capturing Tripoli

Updated 22 min 1 sec ago
0

Libyan militia declares ‘zero hour’ for capturing Tripoli

  • The Libyan National Army called on the young people of Tripoli to work with its forces
  • The internationally-recognized government in Tripoli issued a statement saying it had gathered intelligence about possible airstrikes by LNA forces

CAIRO: The self-styled Libyan National Army is declaring “zero hour” in its offensive to capture the capital, Tripoli, from the UN-backed government.
The LNA, led by commander Khalifa Haftar, called on the young people of Tripoli to work with its forces, via a post on its Facebook page published early Saturday.
Meanwhile, the internationally-recognized government in Tripoli issued a statement saying it had gathered intelligence about possible airstrikes by LNA forces against key sites in the capital, including the only functioning airport.
The Government of National Accord in Tripoli said Friday it had intelligence suggesting airstrikes against the capital by Haftar’s allies — including Egypt, the United Arab Emirates and France — were likely.
Libya sank into chaos after Muammar Qaddafi’s 2011 ouster and is now divided between rival administrations.