Abu Dhabi launches Middle East’s first electric passenger bus

The all-electric Eco-Bus was jointly developed by green energy company Masdar, technology company Siemens, local bus manufacturer Hafilat and Abu Dhabi’s transport authority. (WAM)
Updated 08 January 2019
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Abu Dhabi launches Middle East’s first electric passenger bus

  • Masdar has already invested $8.5 billion in renewable energy projects nationally and abroad
  • The bus will offer free service until March

DUBAI: Abu Dhabi has launched the first fully electric passenger bus in the Middle East, as the UAE capital ramps up efforts to meet its clean energy target by 2021.

The all-electric Eco-Bus was jointly developed by green energy company Masdar, technology company Siemens, local bus manufacturer Hafilat and the emirate’s transport authority, a report from state news agency WAM said.

Masdar, wholly-owned by Abu Dhabi investment fund Mubadala Investment Company, has already invested $8.5 billion in renewable energy projects nationally and abroad. The electric bus is expected to help the country achieve its 27 percent clean energy target by 2021.

The Eco-Bus can seat up to 30 passengers, and every battery charge will last 150 kilometers. The vehicle uses solar panels to power the auxiliary systems, and is also specially designed to endure the heat and humidity in the country. The bus, which will offer free service until March, will operate on a six-stop route from Marina Mall and Masdar City.

The initiative was part of efforts to promote the use of sustainable and intelligent transport modes, and making it a part of the daily lives of public transport users, a statement from the developers said.


UN envoy warns of ‘long and bloody war’ in Libya

Updated 13 min 49 sec ago
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UN envoy warns of ‘long and bloody war’ in Libya

UNITED NATIONS: The UN envoy for Libya warned Tuesday the battle for Tripoli was “just the start of a long and bloody war” and called for immediate steps to cut off arms flows fueling the fighting.
Addressing the Security Council, Ghassan Salame said many countries were supplying weapons to the UN-recognized government in Tripoli and forces led by Khalifa Haftar.
Haftar launched an offensive on April 4 to seize the capital but his forces have been bogged down in the southern outskirts of Tripoli.
“The violence on the outskirts of Tripoli is just the start of a long and bloody war on the southern shores of the Mediterranean, imperilling the security of Libya’s immediate neighbors and the wider Mediterranean region,” Salame said.
Without immediate action to stop the flow of arms, “Libya will descend into civil war which could potentially lead to a Hobbesian all-against-all state of chaos or partition of the country,” he said.
Salame also said that Daesh has begun to reappear in Libya, and have set up flags in the south of the country.
The Security Council failed last month to agree on a draft resolution demanding a cease-fire in Libya and a return to political talks to end the conflict.
Russia refused to include any mention of Haftar’s offensive on Tripoli while the United States said it needed more time to consider the situation, diplomats said.
The envoy urged the council to set up a commission of inquiry to “determine who has taken up arms” and prevent indicted war crimes suspects from taking part in military operations.
More than 75,000 people have been driven from their homes in the latest fighting and 510 have been killed, according to the World Health Organization.