High-end holidays: A look at some of the world’s most exclusive luxury destinations

Viceroy Bali. (Supplied)
Updated 10 January 2019
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High-end holidays: A look at some of the world’s most exclusive luxury destinations

  • A list of luxurious travel spots
  • Destinations all over the world

DUBAI: Here are some of the world’s most luxurious holiday spots:

Fogo Island Inn, Newfoundland, Canada
From $1,493
Fancy a stay at the end of the world? This boutique hotel on a remote island isn’t easy to get to (quickest way: charter a helicopter), but it’s well worth the journey for the astonishing views and the opportunity — through a sponsorship program — to spend time with locals and really get to explore the area’s culture. Of course, that’s optional, you’re equally welcome to simply lounge around in one of the rooftop hot tubs as well. This really is a place for lovers of the outdoors and nature, though. Take advantage of the guided hikes and the knowledgeable, mostly local, staff and lose yourself in the sparse beauty and unique atmosphere of Fogo Island.

Viceroy Bali, Indonesia
From $818
Recently voted the world’s best resort by readers of Condé Nast Traveler, the Viceroy is situated in the “Valley of Kings,” close to Ubud, and offers jaw-dropping views of the gorgeous jungle landscape and wildlife that surrounds the 25-room resort. The private villas, spa, fine dining and acclaimed customer service combine to offer a truly spectacular experience that should appeal to romantics and adventurers alike, and has resulted in almost-unanimous top ratings for the Viceroy in online reviews.

Constance Moofushi, Maldives
From $1,300
This all-inclusive resort on a small private island is perfect for those looking for a beachside escape, especially watersport enthusiasts — the resort boasts its own house reef, but is also less than an hour’s boat ride from some of the best diving spots in the world. Constance Moofushi has 110 rooms, all with great sea views, although some are more equal than others, perched directly above the water. This isn’t a destination for culture vultures, but if you want to lounge around in the sun and sand, sampling some great food and drink, then this idyllic resort will take some beating.

Pikaia Lodge Galapagos, Ecuador
From $4,680 for 3 nights (minimum stay)
“Designed for the environmentally conscious, physically active and adventurous traveler,” according to its website, this beautiful destination is situated in every evolution fan’s favorite location, the Galapagos Islands, and offers a — for once non-clichéd — once-in-a-lifetime experience in one of the world’s most bio-diverse environments. The islands’ otherworldly landscapes are magnificent, and the 14-room Pikaia Lodge is perfectly placed (on top of two extinct volcanic craters, 450 meters above sea level) to afford guests the best possible views of them. Set in 31 hectares, including a private wild giant tortoise reserve, Pikaia Lodge claims to have its own mosquito-free microclimate.

Shangri-La Barr al Jissah Resort & Spa, Oman
From $233
This resort combines two hotels — Al Waha (262 rooms) and Al Bandar (198 rooms) — both with breathtaking views over the waters of the Arabian Gulf and the cliffs that enclose the resort’s beaches in its private inlet, accessed via a man-made tunnel through the mountains. Snorkel in the turquoise sea and track sea-turtles, or simply lounge on some of the finest beaches in the Gulf. For the more adventurous, there are plenty of opportunities, from kite-surfing and kayaking to jet-packing. The resort boasts nine restaurants as well as an art gallery, and shops selling local crafts. Those in search of pampering should visit CHI, The Spa, which offers a vitality hydro pool, herbal steam room and an ice fountain, alongside its 12 treatment villas. This is luxury at a bargain price.

Necker Island, British Virgin Islands
From $77,500 per night for exclusive use
If you’ve got the cash to splash, then you and 29 friends can rent this private island as your exclusive holiday resort from owner Richard Branson. As you’d expect, for that price you get some serious ‘barefoot luxury’ to enjoy — from the abundant local wildlife, great sailing, diving and swimming locations, through yoga, tennis and kitesurfing, to spa treatments, and themed parties on some evenings. If you save a bit of space in your suitcase, you can also help the local community by bringing in medical supplies or educational aid. There are also a few excursions available to nearby islands.

The Oberoi Vanyavilas, Ranthambhore, India
From $603
A few hours drive from Delhi this classy retreat has the feel of an old-school safari camp (only with air-conditioning and high-speed Internet). With spacious private tents situated among mango and lemon groves, featuring teak floors, canopied four-poster beds, and standalone, claw-foot bathtubs — and each serviced by a personal butler, of course — visitors will feel like they’ve gone back in time. You may well be greeted by elephants on arrival, and on the twice-daily game drives, you could spot leopards, bears and even tigers — or take the river safari to track down the Gharial, India’s endangered crocodilian. Romantics, meanwhile, can treat themselves to a three-hour couples massage at the spa.

Bunga Raya Island Resort, Malaysia
From $1,245
A secluded hideaway just off the coast of Borneo, this small resort island consists of 47 sumptuous hillside villas (fully equipped with all mod cons) with views out over the beach to the South China Sea. Explore the tropical jungle — either on foot (one four-hour trek will take you across the whole island), or by zip line — and the warm waters, by sailboat, kayak or paddleboard. Scuba diving is also available. Wind down at the spa, which offers both Asian and Western treatments. Guests can order a romantic private meal in a beach pavilion, or dine at one of the resort’s well-reviewed restaurants, some of which require a boat journey to reach.

 


Delightful Delhi: a heady mix of culture, cuisine and shopping

Delightful Delhi:a heady mix of culture, cuisine and shopping. (Shutterstock)
Updated 17 January 2019
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Delightful Delhi: a heady mix of culture, cuisine and shopping

  • New Delhi is where India’s rich, complex history collides with its post-modern ambitions
  • The best way to discover this great city is through its food, temples and shopping streets

DUBAI: Mirza Ghalib once poetically quoted his own soul as saying: “The world is the body and Delhi is its heart.”

Lofty as the claim is, there are probably few better ways to describe this chaotic, colorful city, where India’s rich, complex history collides with its post-modern ambitions, where the country’s power players live minutes from abject poverty, where many different cultures, cuisines and faiths seamlessly coexist. For such extreme contrasts to find a rhythmic harmony, heart needs to be a big part of the equation.

While there are guidebooks aplenty to show you around the many historical sights, the incredible architecture, and the museums and art of Delhi, the best way to discover the heart (and soul) of this great city is through its food, temples and shopping streets.

Delhi’s finest food can arguably be found at Indian Accent. Regularly ranked as India’s best restaurant in various awards, this upscale eatery is one of the pioneers of modern Indian dining, offering an inventive take on traditional Indian flavors, and combining them with European-style finesse. There are many others doing similar things in India now, but under the stewardship of celebrated executive chef Manish Mehrotra, Indian Accent continues to maintain its podium finish status.

The contemporary, intimate venue oozes understated sophistication — with not a hint of Indian kitsch in sight — providing the perfect setting for the seasonal menus. An amuse-bouche could include delicate carrot shorba (soup), aloo tikki (potato croquettes) and mini dhoklas (steamed fermented rice cakes), while a must-try dish is the restaurant’s refined take on that quintessential street food phuchka (‘potato spheres’ stuffed with spicy mashed potato and doused in flavored waters — served here as shooters in five different flavors). Best to place your trust in the chefs however, and try the degustation menu (which should include their signature dessert, daulat ki chaat, an Old Delhi classic of chilled mousse-like cream; but if it doesn’t, ask for it).

Elsewhere, Lavash by Saby — a classic example of Delhi’s multi-faceted dining scene — specializes in the delicious micro-cuisine of Bengal Armenians. This trendy venue is located in the chic precinct of Mehrauli.

Delhi is home some of India’s largest Hindu temples and mosques, but the non-denominational Bah’ai Lotus House is my top recommendation for those seeking some spirituality. Acclaimed for its unique lotus design — not dissimilar to the Sydney Opera House — the white marble temple is worth visiting as much for its award-winning architecture as for the tranquility that suffuses its atmosphere. Bah’ai temples welcome everyone, without discrimination, and this is a true oasis, offering a welcome respite from the city’s hustle and bustle.

For more wonderful architecture, visit the “spiritual-cultural campus” of Akshardham. It’s a relatively modern structure among the thousands of ancient temples across India, but what it may lack in historic value, it more than makes up for in the beauty of its buildings and their surroundings. The impressive architecture incorporates a variety of traditional styles, and Akshardham provides a diversity of attractions for visitors, from exhibitions to its stunning gardens.

If you’re looking for retail — rather than spiritual — therapy, Delhi runs the gamut of options, from designer boutiques to street-side stalls. To shop like a local, head to Mehar Chand Market, the city’s latest retail district. A (relatively) recently gentrified precinct, this neighborhood market has replaced its groceries and tailoring shops with chic stores, all with a distinct skew toward the indie and artisanal. Amidst the quirky street art, the stylishly updated heritage shophouses are now home to handspun garments in Ekmatra, unique homeware in Nicobar, eclectic designs in The Shop, plus boutiques by a new brigade of Indian designers including Masaba. The enclave is also emerging as a dining hub, with venues such as Altitude Café (a healthy eatery offering locally-inspired gourmet goodies) punctuating the stores.

Also popular among Delhi’s trendsetters is Hauz Khas Village — a historic complex in which the medieval-era buildings now house an achingly hip selection of designer boutiques, galleries and cafés.

Even if you’ve only got a few days to spare, a trip to this thriving city should satisfy any visitor, regardless of their aims. Delhi really does have something for everyone, and fully justifies Ghalib’s lofty claims on its behalf.