Egypt shuts six ports due to bad weather

A general view of buildings during a sandstorm in Cairo, Egypt January 13, 2019. (Reuters)
Updated 13 January 2019

Egypt shuts six ports due to bad weather

  • The ports of Suez and Zeitiyat were shut in Suez governorate, as well as Adabiya and Ain Sokhna ports
  • The Egyptian Meteorological Authority said “active southwesterly winds in the north of the country are stirring sand and dust"

SUEZ/ALEXANDRIA: Egypt has closed four ports on the Red Sea and two on the Mediterranean due to bad weather, officials said on Sunday.
The ports of Suez and Zeitiyat were shut in Suez governorate, the Red Sea Ports Authority said. Adabiya and Ain Sokhna ports, in the same governorate, also closed, a source at the General Authority for the Suez Canal Economic Zone said.
The ports of Alexandria and Dekheila on the Mediterranean were shut in Alexandria governorate, said Reda Ghandour, a spokesman for the Alexandria Port Authority.
He added that loading and unloading of docked vessels was continuing despite the closures.
The Egyptian Meteorological Authority said “active southwesterly winds in the north of the country are stirring sand and dust, leading to the disruption of maritime navigation on the Red and Mediterranean seas.”


Bashir defense asks Sudan court for bail release

Updated 24 August 2019

Bashir defense asks Sudan court for bail release

  • Bashir, wearing a traditional white gown, sat in the same metal cage he appeared in on Monday when his trial on graft charges opened
  • The former Sudanese leader is also wanted by the International Criminal Court in The Hague over his role in mass killings in the western region of Darfur

KHARTOUM: Sudan’s deposed military ruler Omar Al-Bashir appeared in court Saturday for the second hearing of his corruption trial, during which his defense asked for his release on bail.
Bashir, wearing a traditional white gown, sat in the same metal cage he appeared in on Monday when his trial on graft charges opened.
The judge in Khartoum Saturday heard three witnesses, two of them investigators who searched Bashir’s residency after his ouster and the other a banker.
“We ask the court to release the accused on bail,” Bashir’s lawyer Hashem Abu Bakr said, to which the judge answered he would examine a written request.
After the hearing, as a massive security convoy escorted the 75-year-old Bashir back to prison, two opposing groups of demonstrators had gathered.
One group of a few dozen protesters were chanting slogans for Bashir to face justice not just over corruption but for his role in the the country’s deadly conflicts.
“Bashir is a killer” and “He has to face justice,” chanted some of the demonstrators.
Another smaller group had turned out in support of the deposed Islamist general, who was forced from power by relentless protests in April after 30 years in power.
While the sight of Bashir sitting inside a cage in a courtroom was unthinkable only months ago, many in Sudan and abroad have warned that this trial should not distract from the more serious indictments he faces.
The former Sudanese leader is wanted by the International Criminal Court in The Hague over his role in mass killings in the western region of Darfur.