Saudi female bikers ready to chart a new course

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Bikers Skills Institute began training female riders as soon as the driving ban was lifted. (AN photo by Essam Al-Ghalib)
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Bikers Skills Institute began training female riders as soon as the driving ban was lifted. (AN photo by Essam Al-Ghalib)
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Bikers Skills Institute began training female riders as soon as the driving ban was lifted. (AN photo by Essam Al-Ghalib)
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Bikers Skills Institute began training female riders as soon as the driving ban was lifted. (AN photo by Essam Al-Ghalib)
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Bikers Skills Institute began training female riders as soon as the driving ban was lifted. (AN photo by Essam Al-Ghalib)
Updated 03 February 2019
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Saudi female bikers ready to chart a new course

  • Saudi Arabia’s female motorcyclists await clarification on licenses
  • The royal decree in September 2017 that gave women the right to drive in the Kingdom from June 2018 stipulated that the laws on driving would be equal for men and women

JEDDAH: Almost seven months since Saudi Arabia lifted its ban on female drivers, women hoping to be granted a license to ride a motorcycle are still waiting. According to Wael Huraib, founder of Bikers Skills Institute (BSI) — which he claims is the only motorcycle training school for female riders in the Kingdom — no motorbike licenses are currently being issued for women.
“For ladies, as of now, they’re not able to get a license yet, and we don’t really know why,” said Huraib. “We heard that women have received tractor-trailer licenses, but we know for a fact that no motorcycle license applications are being processed. We are assuming the traffic police are very focused on cars, but whatever the problem is, we hope it is resolved soon.”
The royal decree in September 2017 that gave women the right to drive in the Kingdom from June 2018 stipulated that the laws on driving would be equal for men and women. But it appears that is not yet the case, despite assurances from the Saudi Directorate of Traffic a year ago that women would be permitted to drive motorcycles and trucks.

Elena Bukaryeva, an instructor at BSI, said she suspects there is some confusion or miscommunication between the traffic police administration and the licensing division.
“My husband spoke to one of the highest-ranking traffic police officials in Riyadh,” she told Arab News. “He said that there was nothing at all to stop women being issued motorcycle licenses.
“But the following day, one of the ladies who finished our course went to the traffic police and she was told there are no motorcycle licenses for women, only for men. The same thing happened when I applied for my license and when other women did.”
The General Directorate of Traffic did not respond to Arab News’ request for comment.
Bukaryeva said that she has heard of women with licenses issued abroad riding motorcycles in the Kingdom, although added that they are “semi-disguised as men” when doing so.
“When you are wearing loose clothing and a full-face helmet, no one can tell if you are a man or a woman,” she said, adding that she has not tried it herself as her husband told her it was not worth the risk.
BSI began training female riders as soon as the driving ban was lifted.
The company has graduated 18 women so far, including Reem Al-Megbel, a 30-year-old Saudi financial operations manager.
Al-Megbel was at the motorcycle school on Wednesday evening to practice riding, because she cannot, yet, do so on the roads.
“My dream is to wake up one day and have a car and a motorcycle in my garage and be free to choose what to drive,” she said. “It would probably be the motorcycle.”
Al-Megbel added that her “ultimate” dream, though, would be to take a road trip across the Kingdom with a group of fellow female bikers.


Saudi Arabia’s first electronic cochlear implant performed in Jubail 

Updated 1 min 7 sec ago
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Saudi Arabia’s first electronic cochlear implant performed in Jubail 

  • The implant was successfully conducted for a 15-month-old baby who was born completely deaf

JUBAIL: A medical team at the Royal Commission Hospital in Jubail has performed Saudi Arabia’s first electronic cochlear implant operation.

The head of the team, Dr. Mohammed Al-Sheikh, said the implant was successfully conducted for a 15-month-old baby who was born completely deaf. An Auditory Brainstem Response test was previously run to ascertain the nature of the baby’s condition when the parents noticed its failure to respond to sound.

Dr. Mohammed Al-Muqbel, head of the health services program at the Royal Commission in Jubail, praised the efforts of Al-Sheikh and his staff. Al-Sheikh added that credit was also due to the Newborn Hearing Screening Program at the hospital, which worked in collaboration with the audiology unit to provide early intervention and treatment for babies born with hearing defects.

The operation, meanwhile, represents a groundbreaking moment in technological development for Saudi medicine, making the next generation of auditory aids available to citizens, and removing barriers for deaf children from an increasingly early age.