Greek musician Yanni dedicates song to Saudi Arabia ahead of Winter at Tantora performance

Greek musician Yanni (Yiannis Chryssomallis) performs at a concert in the King Abdullah Economic City, 100 kilometres north of the Saudi Red Sea port city of Jeddah on November 30, 2017. (File/AFP)
Updated 19 January 2019
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Greek musician Yanni dedicates song to Saudi Arabia ahead of Winter at Tantora performance

  • The piece is called “When Dream Come True”
  • Yanni said that he was “very honored” to be performing at Al-Ula

Renowned Greek composer and musician Yanni dedicated a piece of music to Saudi Arabia ahead of his performance at the Winter at Tantora Festival.

The music festival will be held at the archaeological site Al-Ula, the capital of the ancient Arabian kingdom of Lihyan.

Describing the location as “absolutely stunning,” Yanni said that he was “very honored” to be performing at the site.

“I have prepared a piece of music that I would like to dedicate to them, to all the Saudis, my friends,” he said in a video message that he posted on his Twitter page.

“I want to remind them of their vision 2030. It’s their dream, it’s what they hope their country would become, what they want to see their country become,” he said.

The piece which he says has never performed live called “When Dream Come True,” was composed in 60 different cities.  

“I think it is very appropriate to play it at Al-Ula and remind and encourage and inspire the Saudis to go after their 2030 vision, to go after their dream,” Yanni said.

Yanni will wrap up the concert series dubbed “Stars Under Starts” on Feb. 8.


What We Are Reading Today: Democracy and Dictatorship in Europe by Sheri Berman

Updated 21 April 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Democracy and Dictatorship in Europe by Sheri Berman

In Democracy and Dictatorship in Europe, Sheri Berman traces the long history of democracy in its cradle, Europe. 

In her study of European political development over more than 200 years, Berman, a professor of political science at Barnard, shows that the story of democracy in Europe is complicated. 

“The ultimate goal, she believes, is liberal democracy, with elections, respect for the rule of law, individual liberties and minority rights. But that is a rare, and hard-won, achievement. A step forward is often followed by a step back,”  said Max Strasser in a review published in The New York Times.

“This may seem a bit obvious to anyone familiar with the broad outlines of European history, but Berman makes the case clearly and convincingly. Moreover, at a moment when hyperventilating over the decline of democracy has grown into a veritable intellectual industry, her long-view approach comes across as appealingly sober,” Strasser added.