Bollywood star Nargis Fakhri to strike a pose at Dubai yoga fest

Bollywood actress Nargis Fakhri is set to host the opening session of the XYoga Dubai Festival on Feb. 1. (File photo: AFP)
Updated 20 January 2019
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Bollywood star Nargis Fakhri to strike a pose at Dubai yoga fest

DUBAI: Bollywood actress Nargis Fakhri is set to host the opening session of the XYoga Dubai Festival on Feb. 1, so yoga fans can expect to bend, stretch and breathe with the glamorous star herself.
Fakhri has starred in Bollywood hits such as “Rockstar” and “Main Tera Hero” and also crossed over into Hollywood in 2015 film “Spy,” in which she appeared alongside Melissa McCarthy and Jude Law.

The actress is a self-declared fitness enthusiast and will lead a session at the weekend festival alongside yoga practitioner Deepika Mehta.
“Yoga has been a big part of my life for over a decade now — it helps me stay centered, focused and positive throughout the day,” Fakhri said in a statement.
“It is not just about flexibility and fitness but also about will-power, mental strength and finding common ground with others,” she added. “As a devoted practitioner and student, I am really looking forward to learning from Deepika, who is one of the most innovative and inspirational yoga trainers. I’m also looking forward to immersing myself in the practice with yogis in Dubai.”
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So grateful for life. For friends, for family, for my hubby, for my practice, for the nourishing food I eat, my body ... Today on the flight as I was coming to Mumbai, I tried out an exercise and I gave out positivity mentally to any body who caught my eye, and it was incredible, people sensed it and returned it with so much kindness, the air hostess was so kind, the guy sitting next to me on the flight helped me with the baggage, there was this sweet girl waiting outside the airport with a bunch of roses and she gave me the biggest smile back, the taxi guy was lovely .. (but it’s not like Im always this sweet angel or anything, sometimes I can be pretty sharp n cutting , trust me!!!) But the one thing the Universe taught me is that energy is tangible, if I give out good vibes, they are sent back to me. • The last few days I’ve been maintaining a journal of all the things that I’ve been grateful for in a day, it helps me focus on the good stuff, makes me more mindful and I take less for granted. • Maybe try out this exercise of writing down 10 things that you are grateful for tomorrow and see what magic manifests. • Love you guys, happy to be in my sweet city

A post shared by Deepika Mehta (@deepikamehtayoga) on

Mehta is a household name in India, where she hosts a TV show called “Yoga City,” was a trainer on “The Biggest Loser” weight loss show and is the personal trainer of a bevvy of celebrities.
The opening session that she will co-host signals the start of the free-to-attend two-day festival and, according to organizers, thousands of yoga enthusiasts are expected to converge on Dubai’s Kite Beach with the aim of achieving the “total synchronization of body, mind and soul.”
The third edition of XYoga Dubai festival will offer fitness lovers the chance to try out various forms of the ancient practice, including animal yoga, vinyasa flow and acro yoga.
The festival offers mixed classes, with ladies only sessions set to take place at the XDubai Studio.
Yoga practitioners from around the world are set to host sessions at the festival, including Iranian-Canadian musician Babak Torabi, who performs alongside yoga classes across the world, and Emilie Mikulla, who has taught people the art of movement in Thailand, South Africa, San Francisco and Dubai.
For more information, visit xyogadubai.com.


Blankets, bed-sharing common in accidental baby suffocations

In this March 22, 2012 file photo, a doctor demonstrates how an infant can die due to unsafe sleeping practices using a scene re-enactment doll in Norfolk, Va. (AP)
Updated 22 April 2019
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Blankets, bed-sharing common in accidental baby suffocations

  • The authors studied 2011-2014 data from a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention registry of deaths in 10 states
  • Young babies can’t easily move away from bedding or a sleeping parent; all of the study deaths were in infants younger than 8 months old

CHICAGO: Accidental suffocation is a leading cause of injury deaths in US infants and common scenarios involve blankets, bed-sharing with parents and other unsafe sleep practices, an analysis of government data found.
These deaths “are entirely preventable. That’s the most important point,” said Dr. Fern Hauck, a co-author and University of Virginia expert in infant deaths.
Among 250 suffocation deaths, roughly 70 percent involved blankets, pillows or other soft bedding that blocked infants’ airways. Half of these soft bedding-related deaths occurred in an adult bed where most babies were sleeping on their stomachs.
Almost 20 percent suffocated when someone in the bed accidentally moved against or on top of them, and about 12 percent died when their faces were wedged against a wall or mattress.
The authors studied 2011-2014 data from a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention registry of deaths in 10 states. The results offer a more detailed look at death circumstances than previous studies using vital records, said lead author Alexa Erck Lambert, a CDC researcher.
The authors said anecdotal reports suggest there’s been little change in unsafe sleep practices in more recent years.
“It is very, very distressing that in the US we’re just seeing this resistance, or persistence of these high numbers,” Hauck said.
The study was published Monday in Pediatrics.
For years, the US government and the American Academy of Pediatrics have waged safe-sleep campaigns aimed at preventing accidental infant suffocations and strangulations and sudden infant death syndrome. These include “back to sleep” advice promoting having babies sleep on their backs, which experts believe contributed to a decline in SIDS deaths over nearly 30 years. But bed-sharing has increased, along with bed-related accidental suffocations — from 6 deaths per 100,000 infants in 1999 to 23 per 100,000 in 2015, the researchers note.
Dr. Rachel Moon, a University of Virginia pediatrics professor not involved in the study, said the results are not surprising.
“Every day I talk to parents who have lost babies. They thought they were doing the right thing, and it seems safe and it seems OK, until you lose a baby,” Moon said.
Some studies have found bed-sharing increases breastfeeding and it’s common in some families because of cultural traditions. Others simply can’t afford a crib.
Erika Moulton, a stay-at-home mom in suburban New York, said bed-sharing was the only way her son, Hugo, would sleep as a newborn. Moulton struggled with getting enough sleep herself for months, and while she knew doctors advise against it, bed-sharing seemed like the only option.
Now 14 months old, “he’s still in our bed,” she said. “Trying to transition him out is a little difficult.”
The pediatricians group recommends that infants sleep on firm mattresses in their own cribs or bassinets but in their parents’ room for the first year. A tight-fitting top sheet is the only crib bedding recommended, to avoid suffocation or strangulation.
Young babies can’t easily move away from bedding or a sleeping parent; all of the study deaths were in infants younger than 8 months old.