What We Are Reading Today: Inheritance by Dani Shapiro

Updated 21 January 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Inheritance by Dani Shapiro

  • The memoir is Dani Shapiro’s most intimate memoir to date

A compelling exploration of paternity, identity, and belonging, Inheritance centers on a shocking discovery about the author’s ancestry. 

This is an excellent memoir about a woman who decides to do an Ancestry.com DNA test. 

She did it on a whim, not expecting to find out her father is not her biological father. 

The memoir, which is in four parts, is Dani Shapiro’s most intimate memoir to date.

“Shapiro’s account is beautifully written and deeply moving — it brought me to tears more than once,” said Ruth Franklin in a review published in the New York Times.

Shapiro is the bestselling author of the memoirs Hourglass, Still Writing, Devotion, and Slow Motion, and five novels including Black & White and Family History. 

She lives with her family in LItchfield County, Connecticut.


What We Are Reading Today: Revolutionizing the Sciences by Peter Dear

Updated 16 February 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Revolutionizing the Sciences by Peter Dear

  • The book reflects on the origins of scientific practice in early modern Europe

This thoroughly revised third edition of an award-winning book offers a keen insight into how the scientific revolution happened and why. Covering central scientific figures, including Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo, Newton, and Bacon, this new edition features greater treatment of alchemy and associated craft activities to reflect trends in current scholarship.

The book reflects on the origins of scientific practice in early modern Europe. Peter Dear traces the revolution in thought that changed the natural world from something to be contemplated into something to be used, says a review on the Princeton University Press website.

Concise and readable, this book is ideal for students who are studying the scientific revolution and its impact on the early modern world. The first edition was the winner of the Watson Davis and Helen Miles Davis Prize of the History of Science Society.