Israel successfully tests advanced missile defense system

Israel is developing a multi-layered anti-ballistic missile system to protect themselves from rockets fired from neighboring countries. Above, Arrow 3 missle launched by the Israeli Defence Ministry in 2015. (AFP)
Updated 22 January 2019
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Israel successfully tests advanced missile defense system

  • The new system being developed by Israelis aims to create a defense against short- and mid-range rockets
  • The anti-ballistic missile was developed by the Israel Aerospace Industries and the US planemaker Boeing

JERUSALEM (AP) — Israel says it has successfully tested the country's advanced missile defense system capable of defending against ballistic missile threats outside the atmosphere.
The Defense Ministry says Tuesday's successful test of the Arrow-3 interceptor is "a major milestone" in Israel's ability to defend itself "against current and future threats in the region." It comes a couple days after Israel thwarted an Iranian missile attack.
Arrow-3 is part of the multi-layered system Israel is developing to defend against both short- and mid-range rockets fired from Gaza and Lebanon, as well as Iran's long-range missiles. It includes Iron Dome, David's Sling, and the Arrow-2 systems.
It was developed by Israel Aerospace Industries and U.S. aviation giant Boeing and became operational in January 2017.
Israel has already deployed Arrow to counter Syrian missiles.


Sudan’s military council, opposition coalition agree political accord

Updated 4 sec ago
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Sudan’s military council, opposition coalition agree political accord

  • The constitutional declaration is expected to be signed on Friday

KHARTOUM: Sudan’s ruling military council and an opposition alliance signed a political accord on Wednesday as part of a power-sharing deal aimed at leading the country nation to democracy.
The agreement was signed in Khartoum in the presence of African mediators following a night of talks to iron out some details of the agreement reached earlier this month.
The deal is meant to pave the way to a political transition in Sudan after military leaders ousted former President Omar Al-Bashir in April following weeks of protests against him.
“We want a stable homeland, because we have suffered a great deal,” Ibrahim Al-Amin, a leader in the opposition Forces of Freedom and Change coalition, said after the ceremony.
Ethiopian mediator Mahmud Dirir said Sudan needed to overcome poverty and called for the country to be taken of a US list of states that support terrorism.
The sides are still working on a constitutional declaration, which is expected to be signed on Friday.