Mariah Carey to perform in Saudi Arabia on January 31

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Mariah Carey will perform in Saudi Arabia on Jan. 31. (AFP)
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Carey performing in Shanghai last year. (AFP)
Updated 27 January 2019
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Mariah Carey to perform in Saudi Arabia on January 31

  • The American singer will play a show as part of the first international golf tournament to be played in the Kingdom
  • Other performers include Dutch DJ Tiesto and Jamaican rapper Sean Paul

JEDDAH: Mariah Carey is to perform in Saudi Arabia for the first time next week.

The American singer will play a show as part of the first international golf tournament to be played in the Kingdom.

The concert will take place on Thursday, Jan 31, at King Abdullah Economic City. 

Other performers during the course of the tournament include Dutch DJ Tiesto, Yemeni-Emirati singer Balqees Fathi and Jamaican rapper Sean Paul.

Part of the European Tour, the inaugural Saudi International, powered by SBIA, takes place between Jan 31 and Feb 3 at the Royal Greens G&CC. 

Carey performing in Shanghai last year. (AFP)

Carey is the latest major international artist to perform in the Kingdom. 

A string of live entertainment performances have been held in Saudi Arabia over the last couple of years, following a lull in the Kingdom hosting such events. 

In October 2016, the New York-based theatrical group iLuminate took to the stage in Riyadh in a rare public performance of music and dance. 

In January 2017, prominent Saudi star Mohammed Abdu performed live in Jeddah — along with Saudi artist Rabeh Sager and the Iraqi-Saudi singer Majid Al-Muhandis — in what was the city’s first open music concert in seven years. 

And last month, A-list stars including Enrique Iglesias, the Black Eyed Peas and David Guetta took to the stage during a three-day music event held during the inaugural Saudia Ad Diriyah E-Prix in Riyadh.

Concert tickets for Mariah Carey and the other performers are on sale at Virgin Megastores or through the website TicketingBoxOffice.com.


With Saudi roots and an Indian heart, Al-Kazi is an act the stage will never forget

Updated 21 February 2019
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With Saudi roots and an Indian heart, Al-Kazi is an act the stage will never forget

  • Though an icon in India, few people know about Al-Kazi’s Saudi roots

JEDDAH: India has always been a hub of art and culture. Over the last century, movies emerged as the most expressive cultural medium, and the Indian film industry — commonly known as Bollywood — has since become a powerhouse of world cinema.

One can never do its history justice without mentioning Ebrahim Al-Kazi.

A renowned director and drama teacher, he worked as the director of the prestigious New Delhi-based National School of Drama (NSD) from 1962 to 1977, teaching many well-known future actors and fellow directors, including Om Puri, Naseeruddin Shah and Rohini Hattangadi. He also founded the Art Heritage Gallery in New Delhi.

Though an Indian icon, however, few people know about Al-Kazi’s Saudi roots. His father, Hamad bin Ali Al-Kazi, was a trader from Unaiza in the Kingdom’s Qassim region, who subsequently settled in Pune, India, where Ebrahim was born in 1925. 

Early on in his career, Al-Kazi worked with the Bombay Progressive Artists Group, which included M.F. Husain, F.N. Souza, S.H. Raza, Akbar Padamsee and Tyeb Mehta, who would all later contribute to the design of his sets.

He worked in India, the US and Europe before becoming the director of the NSD, and later of the Asian Theater Institute, and is credited with staging more than 50 plays in his lifetime. He also contributes to the preservation of Indian cultural history through his Al-Kazi Foundation for the Arts.

In February 2015, Al-Kazi was honored at the second Saudi Film Festival in Dammam. He was later quoted in Arab media sources on his Saudi upbringing: “Our father was a firm believer in our cultural roots that went back to Saudi Arabia, and we spoke only Arabic at home. We had a teacher of Arabic and Islamic studies who came from Saudi Arabia, and lived as part of our family.

“Arab families (in India) did not mix very much with others, but my father had close ties with people other than Arabs,” he added.

Al-Kazi has also won many prestigious Indian awards. He was the first recipient of Roopwedh Pratishthan’s Tanvir Award in 2004 for his contribution to Indian theater, and in 1966 received the Padma Shri award. He won the Padma Bhushan award in 1991, and was given India’s second highest civilian award, the Padma Vibhushan, in 2010.