Prince of Daesh-ravaged Yazidis dies in Germany

The Yazidi faith emerged in Iran more than 4,000 years ago and is rooted in Zoroastrianism, over time integrating elements of Islam and Christianity. (File/AFP)
Updated 28 January 2019
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Prince of Daesh-ravaged Yazidis dies in Germany

  • Prince Tahseen Said Ali died in the KRH Siloah hospital in Hanover at the age of 85
  • Born in 1933 in Iraq’s northwest Sheikhan district, he was appointed head of the Yazidis at age 11 after the death of his father

IRBIL, Iraq: The longtime head of the world’s Yazidis, a minority whose Iraqi community was ferociously targeted by the Daesh group, has died in Germany after a long illness, officials said Monday.
Prince Tahseen Said Ali died in the KRH Siloah hospital in Hanover at the age of 85, according to the head of the Iraqi Kurdish region’s head of Yazidi affairs, Khairi Buzani.
Born in 1933 in Iraq’s northwest Sheikhan district, he was appointed head of the Yazidis at age 11 after the death of his father, who was the previous emir.
His son told local media that Prince Tahseen would be buried in the Kurdish region of northern Iraq.
The region’s prime minister, Nechirvan Barzani, sent condolences to Prince Tahseen’s family on Monday.
The Yazidi faith emerged in Iran more than 4,000 years ago and is rooted in Zoroastrianism, over time integrating elements of Islam and Christianity.
With no holy book and organized into castes, Yazidis pray to God facing the sun and worship his seven angels — first and foremost Melek Taus, or Peacock Angel.
Of the world’s 1.5 million Yazidis, around 550,000 were living in the remote corners of northern Iraq where Prince Tahseen was born, and comprised the largest community before 2014.
Germany is home to the biggest Yazidi community abroad.
In 2014, the Daesh group rampaged across northern Iraq and seized the Yazidi bastion of Sinjar, near the border with Syria.
Daesh fighters slaughtered thousands of Yazidi men and boys, then abducted women and girls to be abused as “sex slaves.”
The brutal assault pushed around 360,000 Yazidis to flee to other parts of Iraq, including the Kurdish region, in addition to another 100,000 who left the country altogether.
The United Nations has said Daesh’s actions could amount to genocide, and is investigating the militant group’s atrocities across Iraq.
The Yazidi cause has found a powerful symbol in Nadia Murad, a former Daesh abductee from Sinjar who escaped and went on to win the Nobel Peace Prize for her activism against sexual violence.
Murad visited Iraq’s Yazidi heartland of Sinjar last month, as well as Baghdad and the Kurdish regional capital of Irbil, to draw attention to the plight of thousands of abducted Yazidi girls who are still missing.


Lebanese budget protesters clash with security in Beirut

Updated 20 May 2019
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Lebanese budget protesters clash with security in Beirut

  • Over one hundred protesters gathered Monday outside the Government House in downtown Beirut
  • Lebanon faces a looming fiscal crisis as the economy struggles with soaring debt

BEIRUT: Security forces opened water cannons on Lebanese anti-austerity protesters in the country’s capital on Monday, as the government continued to hold marathon meetings to discuss severe budget cuts.
Lebanon faces a looming fiscal crisis as the economy struggles with soaring debt, rising unemployment and slow growth. The government’s tightened budget and key reforms aim to unlock billions of dollars in pledged foreign assistance. But planned cuts have unleashed a wave of public discontent, amid leaks that austerity could target public wages, services and social benefits.

A retired Lebanese soldier chants slogans while holding an army flag, during a protest in Beirut, Lebanon, Monday. (AP)

Over one hundred protesters gathered Monday outside the Government House in downtown Beirut shouting “Thieves, thieves!” as the Cabinet met for its 16th session and struggles to reach agreement.
Protesters pushed back against police lines and set fire to tires outside the building. At least two policemen and one civilian were wounded in the scuffles.
Among those demonstrating Monday were public and private school teachers and retired officers.
The government, headed by Prime Minister Saad Hariri, has sought to calm nerves while also describing the upcoming budget as the most austere in Lebanon’s history.
Hariri said he hopes the government will be able to send the budget to parliament later this week.
Finance Minister Ali Hassan Khalil said the cabinet made “important progress” in discussions Sunday.