In five years, this headline will be written by AI

Barling with Dubai Crown Prince Hamdan bin Mohammed Al-Maktoum.
Updated 12 February 2019
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In five years, this headline will be written by AI

  • Artificial intelligence would restore the golden age of journalism, Knowhere news sites co-founder tells World Government Summit
  • Bloomberg’s editor-in-chief emeritus “ says AI will make it easier to work in newsrooms by fighting false news

DUBAI: News headlines across the globe in five years will be drafted by artificial intelligence, Knowhere news site’s co-founder and editor-in-chief said on Monday.

“Artificial intelligence in the newsroom reduces the cost of production, so the individual will not have to pay much for information,” Nathaniel Barling said, adding that AI “would restore the golden age of journalism.”

Speaking at a session on “Automation: Breaking the News” at the World Government Summit in Dubai, Barling said: “Newspapers have lost control because people are now relying on social networks.”

“Newsrooms need to fundamentally transform their revenue models, and re-image the profession of journalism as a whole,” he said.

Barling also spoke of the need for free access to information for all, and said that while paywalls did not affect the quality of journalism, they did allow for more fake news to be spread more easily.

“Paywalls do not hurt the quality of reporting and more consumers are now willing to pay for in-depth long-form content, yet it also raises the question of hiding information from some,” he said.

“Good information is coming to those who pay for it, but this is not the world in which we want to live.”

As AI enters workplaces across several domains, other journalists believe the technology could be detrimental to newsrooms.

Gerard Baker, editor-at-large of The Wall Street Journal, questioned whether artificial intelligence will threaten or strengthen confidence in newsrooms.

“Can we rely on algorithms to settle the big disputes across the globe?” he asked.

However, Matthew Winkler, Bloomberg’s editor-in-chief emeritus, said: “Artificial intelligence will make it easier to work in newsrooms by fighting false news.

“Fake news is not a new phenomenon, and the advent of AI will evolve the newsroom, but not threaten it,” he said.

Mina Al-Oraibi, editor-in-chief of The National in the UAE, said that journalists were being strengthened by AI, which allowed them to focus on the story instead of on sources of information.

“Journalists are now feeling the threat of artificial intelligence, so they are focusing on how much the news is more influential than its accuracy,” she said.

 


Arab News gets more global design recognition

Updated 21 February 2019
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Arab News gets more global design recognition

  • Arab News scooped a Merit Award in the covers and jackets category for its front page
  • The annual competition celebrates design excellence on a global scale

LONDON: Arab News has scooped another international design award.

The Middle East’s leading English-language daily newspaper was recognized in the international design awards run by “HOW” magazine for its iconic Women Drivers cover.

The annual competition celebrates design excellence on a global scale — and every year honors entries from all over the world. 

“For Arab News to be recognized on a global scale with this award is a great honor. There were over 1,100 entries from all over the world so to win a Merit Award is a brilliant achievement,” said Arab News Global Creative Director Simon Khalil.

Arab News scooped a Merit Award in the covers and jackets category for its front page which featured an image of a Saudi woman driving by “New Yorker” illustrator Malika Favre.

It was commissioned by Arab News for the cover of a special souvenir edition on June 24 of last year and has since been shared around the world.

The image, of a road reflected in a woman’s sunglasses, has become one of the most retweeted artworks celebrating women driving in the Kingdom.

“As a champion of women for years through her unique creative style, Malika Favre was the obvious choice for our cover, and her illustration brilliantly captures the significance of this moment on the day Saudi Arabia changed forever,” added Khalil.

“This award will inspire the whole team to produce even better design and content for our readers and we are very pleased the design community has recognized our efforts with this prestigious award.”

This year’s awards attracted some 1,100 entries from around the world.