OECD: Fourth Industrial Revolution ‘exciting’ but has downsides

Face of the future: The humanoid robot Sophia was granted citizenship in Saudi Arabia, the first robot in the world to be given nationality. (Getty Images)
Updated 12 February 2019
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OECD: Fourth Industrial Revolution ‘exciting’ but has downsides

  • Challenge is how to empower half of the workforce that will be displaced
  • National leaders urged to broaden their horizons and make appropriate decisions to create a better future

DUBAI: The Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR) will be exciting and full of promise, but carries downsides, Jose Angel Gurria, the secretary-general of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, said on Monday.

In a discussion with CNN’s Becky Anderson at the World Government Summit (WGS) in Dubai, Gurria said: “The danger is not just about knowing the technology that is growing at breakneck speed, but how you empower half of the workforce that will be displaced.

“The Fourth Industrial Revolution will carry with it many promises and challenges in employing technology and how to use it. Half of the workforce is going to be disrupted by technology, due to over- or under-qualification. How can we motivate and upskill those that will be displaced in the process?”

Gurria focused on the need for countries to realize the effects on labor forces and on generations yet to enter the world of work.

He also urged national leaders to “broaden their horizons and make appropriate decisions in order to create a better future.”

 

Intellectual property in the 4IR

Intellectual property governance policies promote innovation and creativity, according to the World Intellectual Property Organization’s director general, Francis Gurry.

“Effective intellectual property systems ensure that ideas are transformed into products and services that are beneficial to people,” Gurry said. “Through intellectual property, we ensure that good ideas are translated into economic products, balance of interests and competitiveness.”

In 2018 alone, 2.5 million patent applications were filed worldwide, which, Gurry said, explained the need for stricter protection laws.

China and the US lead the world in terms of patent numbers, followed by Japan.

“We have a large number of patents on artificial intelligence, so this sequence must be protected,” Gurry added. “We expect significant changes in the distribution of capacity around the world as a result of the development of artificial intelligence in robots.”

 

Mobility in the 4IR

Artificial intelligence (AI) and nanotechnologies are among the UAE’s key priorities during the 4IR, according to Mattar Mohamed Al-Tayer, Dubai Road and Transport Authority (RTA) general manager.

“The importance of artificial intelligence in the transportation sector lies in three objectives: supporting the management of major events, forecasting traffic, and monitoring and dealing with accidents,” Al-Tayer said during a session at the WGS on “The Future of Mobility in the Age of 4IR.”

He highlighted the accomplishments the RTA has made over the years, turning Dubai into one of the world’s most efficient cities when it comes to mobility and transportation.

“In Dubai, we organized with international transport companies, such as Uber and others, to provide intelligent services to community members.

“The transport sector in Dubai is moving over a million people, and this figure makes us aware of the importance of establishing a solid infrastructure that enhances transportation,” he said.

 


Turkey set to begin oil and gas drilling off Cyprus

Updated 21 February 2019
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Turkey set to begin oil and gas drilling off Cyprus

  • “In the coming days we will start drilling with two ships around Cyprus,” Turkish foreign minister said
  • Turkey and the Cypriot government have overlapping claims of jurisdiction in the eastern Mediterranean

ISTANBUL: Turkey will begin drilling for oil and gas near Cyprus in coming days, state-owned news agency Anadolu reported Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu saying on Thursday, a move that could stoke tensions with neighboring Cyprus and Greece.
Turkey and the internationally recognized Greek Cypriot government have overlapping claims of jurisdiction for offshore oil and gas research in the eastern Mediterranean, a region thought to be rich in natural gas.
“In the coming days we will start drilling with two ships around Cyprus,” Cavusoglu was quoted as saying in a speech to a business conference in western Turkey’s Aydin province.
“Let those who come to the region from far away, and their companies, see that nothing can be done in that region without us. Nothing at all can be done in the Mediterranean without Turkey, we will not allow that,” Cavusoglu said.
Turkey launched its first drillship “Fatih” in October to drill off the coast of Turkey’s southern Antalya province. It said a second ship that it purchased would operate in the Black Sea, but was diverted to the Cyprus area.
Breakaway north Cyprus, which is supported by Turkey, says any offshore wealth also belongs to them, as partners in the establishment of the Republic of Cyprus in 1960.
The island was divided in 1974 after a Turkish invasion triggered by a brief Greek-inspired coup. Countless peacemaking endeavours have failed, and offshore wealth has increasingly complicated peace negotiations, with Greek Cypriots saying the matter is not up for discussion.