Tunisian workers kidnapped in Libya

Forces loyal to Libyan strongman Khalifa Haftar patrol in the southern Libyan city of Sebha, on February 9, 2019. (File/AFP)
Updated 17 February 2019

Tunisian workers kidnapped in Libya

TUNIS: Militiamen have kidnapped a group of Tunisian workers near the Libyan capital Tripoli, demanding Tunis release a comrade, the foreign ministry and a rights activist said.
"The foreign ministry is following the case of the Tunisian citizens... kidnapped by armed Libyan elements near Zawiya", the ministry said on its Facebook page late Friday.
Rights activist Mustapha Abdelkebir said the armed group behind Thursday's kidnappings was demanding the release of one of its members held in Tunisia.
The kidnap victims were workers at Zawiya oil refinery, Tunisian media said. A diplomatic source told AFP that 14 workers had been taken hostage.
"The minister has spoken to his Libyan counterpart to insist on the protection of the detainees, accelerate their release and ensure that they return safe and sound", the ministry said in a statement.
Tunisia reopened a consulate in Libya in 2018, after shutting it three years earlier due to the kidnapping of 10 Tunisian diplomats.
The Libyan militia which carried out the 2015 kidnapping had demanded the release of one of its leaders, Walid Glib, detained in Tunisia as part of a counter-terrorism investigation.
The diplomats were released after several days and Walid Glib was later deported to Tripoli.
Libya's Tripoli-based Government of National Accord said it had no information on Thursday's abduction and that it was looking into the matter.
The country has been mired in chaos since the fall of dictator Muammar Qaddafi in a 2011 NATO-backed uprising, as two rival administrations and numerous militias grapple for power.


Egypt’s iconic Tahrir Square to be renovated

Updated 40 min 57 sec ago

Egypt’s iconic Tahrir Square to be renovated

CAIRO: Egypt’s iconic Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo is about to receive a facelift as part of a project aimed at revitalizing several locations across the country’s vast capital and building on their appeal to the tourism market.

The square was the center of the 2011 uprising that toppled the country’s long-serving autocrat Hosni Mubarak. In 2013, protesters again took to the streets around the square when they called for the ousting of former President Mohammad Mursi.    

Now Egyptian Prime Minister Mostafa Madbouly has called for the historic site to be turned into a tourist destination.

The historic square was created in the 19th century, when it was initially named Ismailia Square. 

In 1952, a military-led revolution abolished the Egyptian monarchy and the square was renamed Tahrir Square, meaning liberation.