Largest mass grave of 3,500 people found outside Raqqa city in Syria

There are some 2,500-3,000 bodies estimated there, plus between 900 and 1,100 bodies in the individual graves. (AFP)
Updated 21 February 2019
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Largest mass grave of 3,500 people found outside Raqqa city in Syria

  • First responders learned of the burial site in the Al-Fukheikha suburb last month

 RAQQA: Two feet deep, below a plot of farmland outside the Syrian city of Raqqa, lies a large and deadly legacy of Daesh: A mass grave holding an estimated 3,500 people.

First responders learned of the burial site in the Al-Fukheikha suburb last month, more than a year after US-backed forces captured Raqqa from Daesh and as they closed in on the group’s final redoubt of Baghouz further south.

The belated discovery is the biggest example yet of how the violence Daesh sowed will be harvested for years to come, diggers and activists said.

Several dozen mounds of dirt line one side of the Al-Fukheikha plot, marking the more than 120 bodies already dug up by the Rapid Response Division of Raqqa’s civil defense service.

“These are individual graves, but behind us, by the trees, are the mass graves of those executed by Daesh,” said Asaad Mohammad, the 56-year-old forensic assistant at the site.

“There are some 2,500-3,000 bodies estimated there, plus between 900 and 1,100 bodies in the individual graves, so at least 3,500 total,” he said.

Eight other mass graves have already been identified around the northern Syrian city, including one nicknamed “Panorama,” from which more than 900 bodies had been exhumed.

Earlier this week, diggers in flimsy medical masks excavated a small bundle wrapped in greying, damp cloth. 

 


Suspected cholera cases in Yemen spike in 2019: UN

Updated 2 min 15 sec ago
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Suspected cholera cases in Yemen spike in 2019: UN

  • The UN office for humanitarian affairs (OCHA) said children under the age of five make up nearly a third of 108,889 cases
  • More than one million suspected cases were reported within an eight-month period that year

SANAA: Nearly 110,000 suspected cases of cholera have been reported in war-hit Yemen since the beginning of January, including 190 related deaths, the UN said on Monday.
The UN office for humanitarian affairs (OCHA) said children under the age of five make up nearly a third of 108,889 cases which were reported between January 1 and March 17.
OCHA said the spike, which comes two years after Yemen suffered its worst cholera outbreak, was concentrated in six governorates including in the Red Sea port of Hodeida and the Sanaa province home to the capital.
Early rains could be blamed for the recent increase in suspected cholera cases, it said.
"The situation is exacerbated by poor maintenance of sewage disposal systems in many of the affected districts, the use of contaminated water for irrigation, and population movements," OCHA added.
The waterborne disease is endemic to Yemen, which witnessed the worst cholera outbreak in its modern history in 2017.
More than one million suspected cases were reported within an eight-month period that year. More than 2,500 people died of the infection between April and December 2017.