Greece to send 1,000 refugees to Portugal

Mothers and their children in a center run by the Amurtel NGO in Athens’ Victoria Square. (AFP)
Updated 08 March 2019

Greece to send 1,000 refugees to Portugal

  • Over 70,000 refugees and migrants have been stranded in Greece following a mass influx from 2015 onwards
  • Conditions are worst on the islands of Lesbos and Samos, where there are over 9,000 people in camps built to handle a third of that number

ATHENS: Greece’s migration ministry on Friday said it had concluded a bilateral agreement with Portugal to gradually relocate 1,000 refugees and asylum seekers.
“A first phase involves the relocation of 100 persons granted and/or seeking international protection who are currently in Greek (camps),” the ministry said in a statement.
Over 70,000 refugees and migrants have been stranded in Greece following a mass influx from 2015 onwards. Most were fleeing war-torn Syria and want to go to wealthier EU states such as Germany.
Of these, over 15,000 are housed in badly overcrowded camps on Greek islands where living conditions have been repeatedly criticized by rights groups.
Conditions are worst on the islands of Lesbos and Samos, where there are over 9,000 people in camps built to handle a third of that number.
The Greek government says the problem is partly caused by a huge backlog of refugee asylum applications, and by the refusal of several EU states to take in asylum-seekers.


Australia plans to censor extremist online content

Updated 26 August 2019

Australia plans to censor extremist online content

  • The country will create a 24/7 Crisis Coordination Center for monitoring and censorship
  • Australia earlier set up a task force with tech giants to address spread of extremist material online

SYDNEY: Australia plans to block websites to stop the spread of extreme content during “crisis events,” the country’s prime minister has said.
Speaking from the G7 in Biarritz Sunday, Scott Morrison said the measures were needed in response to the deadly attack on two New Zealand mosques in March.
The live-streamed murder of 51 worshippers “demonstrated how digital platforms and websites can be exploited to host extreme violent and terrorist content,” he said in a statement.
“That type of abhorrent material has no place in Australia, and we are doing everything we can to deny terrorists the opportunity to glorify their crimes, including taking action locally and globally.”
Under the measures, Australia’s eSafety Commissioner would work with companies to restrict access to domains propagating terrorist material.
A new 24/7 Crisis Coordination Center will be tasked with monitoring terror-related incidents and extremely violent events for censorship.
In the wake of the Christchurch attack, Australia set up a task force with global tech giants like Facebook, YouTube, Amazon, Microsoft and Twitter to address the spread of extremist material online.
It is not yet clear how the measures will be enforced. Morrison has previously suggested that legislation may come if technology companies do not cooperate.