Kuwaiti MPs call for 50% of expats to be deported

The Kuwaitization drive is part of the government’s push to recruit more of its citizens. (Shutterstock)
Updated 12 March 2019
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Kuwaiti MPs call for 50% of expats to be deported

  • The Kuwaitization drive is part of the government’s push to recruit more of its citizens
  • A proposal is pushing for the deportation of 50 percent of the 3.3 million expats living in the gulf country over the next five years

DUBAI: Kuwaiti MPs have called on their government to slash the number of expat workers by half and end what they referred to as “their onslaught on public services,” national daily Kuwait Times reported on Monday.

MP Khalid Al-Saleh said the government should follow a proposal pushing for the deportation of 50 percent of the 3.3 million expats living in the gulf country over the next five years.

“The government must adopt serious measures to save the country from the (expatriate) typhoon that has taken up services and jobs,” Al-Saleh said, adding that “We have to work with the plan immediately so as to reduce the number of expatriates by 50 percent over the next five years, especially since a majority of them are marginal laborers.”

The Kuwaitization drive is part of the government’s push to recruit more of its citizens, a similar push is underway across the GCC where Saudi Arabia and Oman have also been trying to increase the number of locals in employment.


Apple’s Cook to China: keep opening for sake of global economy

Updated 23 March 2019
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Apple’s Cook to China: keep opening for sake of global economy

  • Cook’s comments come as Apple weathers sinking sales in China
  • Despite official pledges and repeated assurances that China would continue to open its markets

BEIJING: Apple chief executive Tim Cook nudged China on Saturday to open up and said the future would depend on global collaboration, as the United States and China remained locked in a bitter trade dispute.
“We encourage China to continue to open up, we see that as essential, not only for China to reach its full potential, but for the global economy to thrive,” Cook said at a China Development Forum in Beijing.
Despite official pledges and repeated assurances that China would continue to open its markets, some analysts worry that its reform project has slowed or even stalled under President Xi Jinping, who has sought greater control over the economy and a bigger role for state-owned firms at the expense of the private sector.
Cook’s comments come as Apple weathers sinking sales in China because of a contracting smartphone market, increasing pressure from Chinese rivals, and slowing upgrade cycles. The company reported a revenue drop of 26 percent in the greater China region during the quarter ending in December.
Before those results came out, in a January letter to investors, Cook blamed the company’s poor China performance on trade tension between the United States and China, suggesting that pressure on the economy was hurting sales in China.