Kuwaiti MPs call for 50% of expats to be deported

The Kuwaitization drive is part of the government’s push to recruit more of its citizens. (Shutterstock)
Updated 12 March 2019

Kuwaiti MPs call for 50% of expats to be deported

  • The Kuwaitization drive is part of the government’s push to recruit more of its citizens
  • A proposal is pushing for the deportation of 50 percent of the 3.3 million expats living in the gulf country over the next five years

DUBAI: Kuwaiti MPs have called on their government to slash the number of expat workers by half and end what they referred to as “their onslaught on public services,” national daily Kuwait Times reported on Monday.

MP Khalid Al-Saleh said the government should follow a proposal pushing for the deportation of 50 percent of the 3.3 million expats living in the gulf country over the next five years.

“The government must adopt serious measures to save the country from the (expatriate) typhoon that has taken up services and jobs,” Al-Saleh said, adding that “We have to work with the plan immediately so as to reduce the number of expatriates by 50 percent over the next five years, especially since a majority of them are marginal laborers.”

The Kuwaitization drive is part of the government’s push to recruit more of its citizens, a similar push is underway across the GCC where Saudi Arabia and Oman have also been trying to increase the number of locals in employment.


US President Trump does not want to do business with China’s Huawei

Updated 19 August 2019

US President Trump does not want to do business with China’s Huawei

  • US Commerce Department expected to extend a reprieve that permits Huawei to buy supplies from US companies to service its customers

WASHINGTON: US President Donald Trump on Sunday said he did not want the United States to do business with China’s Huawei even as the administration weighs whether to extend a grace period for the company.
Reuters and other media outlets reported on Friday that the US Commerce Department is expected to extend a reprieve given to Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd. that permits the Chinese firm to buy supplies from US companies so that it can service existing customers.
The “temporary general license” will be extended for Huawei for 90 days, Reuters reported, citing two sources familiar with the situation.
On Sunday, Trump told reporters before boarding Air Force One in New Jersey that he did not want to do business with Huawei for national security reasons.
He said there were small parts of Huawei’s business that could be exempted from a broader ban, but that it would be “very complicated.” He did not say whether his administration would extend the “temporary general license.”
Speaking earlier on Sunday, National Economic Council director Larry Kudlow said the Commerce department would extend the Huawei licensing process for three months as a gesture of “good faith” amid broader trade negotiations with China.
“We’re giving a break to our own companies for three months,” Kudlow said on NBC’s “Meet the Press.”