Dubai photography competition shows off breathtaking snaps

A dark room used for developing photos. (Shutterstock/File)
Updated 13 March 2019
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Dubai photography competition shows off breathtaking snaps

  • The award nurtures the art of photography by supporting international and national talents
  • HIPA awards photographers a total amount of $450,000 each year

DUBAI: The eighth Hamdan bin Mohammed bin Rashid Al-Maktoum International Photography Award (HIPA) awarded Edwin Ong Wee Kee with the grand prize in a ceremony held at the Dubai Opera on Tuesday.

The annual competition celebrates the art of photography and aims to encourage international and national photographers to keep exploring the field by awarding a total of $450,000 to winners.

Every year, photographers are given a theme which they must interpret when shooting their submitted snaps. This year, the theme is hope, which was described by organizers as “an infinite fuel for life.” The winning image in this category will secure the photographer a prize of $25,000.

There are three other categories this year — portfolio or storytelling, the general submissions section and aerial photography. The general category is divided into two sub-categories; color and black and white.

Last year, HIPA introduced a set of awards to recognize the efforts of professionals whose work contributed to the field of photography; the photography appreciation award, the photography content creator award and the emerging person in photography award.

HIPA announced the winners via its Instagram page last week.

The panel awarded Tim Flach with the photography appreciation award. Flach is a London-based photographer, whose work focuses on the way humans affect animals.

“At this point in history, we are growing further away from the world of nature while we are increasingly in need of it, in terms of food, climate and other important issues. Many in our world still do not realize the gravity of the challenges that require us to protect nature more,” he said in response to winning the award, according to the HIPA website.

Meanwhile, Tom Ang received the content creator award. Ang was one of the founding members of an organization which grew into Photofusion, one of the largest independent photography resources in London.

HIPA awarded Emirati photographer Yousef Al-Habshi the emerging person in photography award for his work in the world of macro and micro photography, which has been featured in National Geographic magazine.


Bong d’Or: Korean director wins Cannes’ top prize

Updated 25 May 2019
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Bong d’Or: Korean director wins Cannes’ top prize

  • French-Senegalese director Mati Diop’s “Atlantics" wins festival’s second place award, the Grand Prize
  • Belgian brothers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne shared the best director for “Young Ahmed”

CANNES, France: South Korean director Bong Joon-ho’s social satire “Parasite,” about a poor family of hustlers who find jobs with a wealthy family, won the Cannes Film Festival’s top award, the Palme d’Or, on Saturday.
The win for “Parasite” marks the first Korean film to ever win the Palme. In the festival’s closing ceremony, jury president Alejandro Inarritu said the choice had been “unanimous” for the nine-person jury.
The genre-mixing film had been celebrated as arguably the most critically acclaimed film at Cannes this year and the best yet from the 49-year-old director of “Snowpiercer” and “Okja.”
It was the second straight Palme victory for an Asian director. Last year, the award went to Japanese filmmaker Hirokazu Kore-eda’s “Shoplifters.”
Two years ago, Bong was in Cannes’ competition with “Okja,” a movie distributed in North America by Netflix. After it and Noah Baumbach’s “The Meyerowitz Stories” — another Netflix release — premiered in Cannes, the festival ruled that all films in competition needed French theatrical distribution. Netflix has since withdrawn from the festival on the French Riveira.
The festival’s second place award, the Grand Prize, went to French-Senegalese director Mati Diop’s “Atlantics.” Diop was the first black female director in competition at Cannes.
Belgian brothers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne shared the best director for “Young Ahmed.”
Best actor went to Antonio Banderas for Pedro Almodovar’s “Pain and Glory,” while best actress was won by British actress Emily Beecham for “Little Joe.”
Although few quibbled with the choice of Bong, some had expected Cannes to make history by giving the Palme to a female filmmaker for just the second time.
Celine Sciamma’s period romance “Portrait of a Lady on Fire” was the Palme pick for many critics this year, but it ended up with best screenplay.
In the festival’s 72-year history, only Jane Champion has won the prize in 1993, and she tied with Chen Kaige’s “Farewell My Concubine.”