Security Council members report no progress on Yemen deal

Martin Griffiths reported no progress Wednesday in getting the warring parties to withdraw their forces from the key port of Hodeidah. (AFP file photo)
Updated 13 March 2019
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Security Council members report no progress on Yemen deal

  • France’s Foreign Minister Francois Delattre, the current council president, said the report was “not good
  • The first significant fighting since the ceasefire erupted in Hodeidah on Sunday

UNITED NATIONS: Security Council members said envoy Martin Griffiths reported no progress Wednesday in getting the warring parties in Yemen to withdraw their forces from the key port of Hodeidah and two smaller ports as called for in an agreement they signed in December.
France’s Foreign Minister Francois Delattre, the current council president, told reporters after Wednesday’s closed-door meeting that his report was “not good.” Belgium’s UN Ambassador Marc Pecsteen de Buytswerve was blunter, telling reporters: “At this point of time there is no progress so the council might do something.”
Griffiths had been more optimistic last month, telling the council he expected the imminent pullout of forces, which would provide an opportunity to move to the major goal of ending the four-year conflict in Yemen that has created the world’s worst humanitarian crisis.
But Britain’s UN Ambassador Karen Pierce said council members have always said the agreement between Yemen’s government and Houthi militants reached in Stockholm “is fragile — and this is proof that it is fragile.”
“I wouldn’t say it was in more trouble than we expected,” she said. “It’s the age old problem of building trust and confidence between the parties.”
“It’s clear that one party has more problems than the other at the moment, but this tends to swing around,” Pierce said, without naming the party.
Griffiths did not speak to reporters.
UN spokesman Stephane Dujarric said Griffiths “informed council members they were still working with the parties to make the redeployment in Hodeida a reality.”
Responding to a question on whether the Hodeidah agreement was unraveling, Dujarric said, “I would not use the term unraveling. I think patience and determination are really the name of the game.”
“No one expected this to be easy,” Dujarric said. “This is the first agreement reached by the parties since the start of the conflict” and Griffiths and the UN redeployment monitoring team “are determined to help the parties to reach an agreement to implement what was actually agreed to.”
Germany’s UN Ambassador Christoph Heusgen said that at Wednesday’s council meeting “there was frustration that we haven’t made more progress.”
“But what was clear is that there is no alternative but to continue on that process and to use all the different channels that are at our disposal to get the parties to implement the Stockholm agreement,” he said.
On Tuesday, the five permanent members of the UN Security Council — China, France, Russia, Britain and the US— called on both sides to implement a peace deal on the port city.
Under the plan agreed on during talks in December, coalition-backed forces and Houthi militiamen would pull out of Hodeidah, while allowing a local force to take control. But on Sunday, fighting erupted in Hodeidah, the first significant clashes since warring sides agreed to a cease-fire.
The conflict in Yemen began with the 2014 takeover of the capital, Sanaa, by the Iranian-backed Houthis.
An Arab coalition including Saudi Arabia has been fighting the Houthis since 2015.
The fighting in the Arab world’s poorest country has killed thousands of civilians, left millions suffering from food and medical care shortages, and pushed the country to the brink of famine.


Security tops agenda as Iraqi PM visits Egypt in first foreign trip

Updated 23 March 2019
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Security tops agenda as Iraqi PM visits Egypt in first foreign trip

  • After meeting Egyptian President Abdel Fattah El-Sisi, Abdul Mahdi highlighted “the importance of drying up the sources of terrorism”
  • The visit to Egypt is Abdul Mahdi’s first trip abroad since taking office in October

CAIRO: Iraqi Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi sought Egypt’s support for efforts to tackle extremist militants in the region during a visit to Cairo on Saturday, his first trip abroad since taking office in October.
After meeting Egyptian President Abdel Fattah El-Sisi, Abdul Mahdi highlighted “the importance of drying up the sources of terrorism” and said “cooperation between Egypt and Iraq will be essential for this matter,” according to an official statement.
His comments came as US-backed forces said they had captured Daesh’s last shred of territory in eastern Syria at Baghouz, ending its territorial rule over a self-proclaimed caliphate straddling Syria and Iraq after years of fighting.
Though the defeat ends the group’s grip over the extremist quasi-state that it declared in 2014, it remains a threat.
Some Daesh fighters still hold out in Syria’s remote central desert and in Iraqi cities they have slipped into the shadows, staging sudden shootings or kidnappings and awaiting a chance to rise again.
The United States thinks the group’s leader, Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi, is in Iraq.
Defeating militants in Egypt’s Sinai Peninsula and restoring security after years of unrest has been a key promise of El-Sisi, the general-turned-president who came to power a year after the military overthrew Islamist President Mohammed Mursi in 2013.
Egypt has fought an insurgency waged by a Daesh affiliate in North Sinai since 2013. Hundreds of members of the security forces have been killed.