North Korea considering suspending nuclear talks with US

Trump told a post-summit press conference in Hanoi that the North Korean leader had promised he would maintain his moratorium on missile and nuclear tests. (File/AFP)
Updated 15 March 2019
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North Korea considering suspending nuclear talks with US

  • Kim would soon make an official statement on the actions his country would take
  • The warning came amid concerns over the North’s satellite rocket launch site, where some rebuilding activity has been observed in recent weeks

SEOUL: North Korea is considering suspending denuclearization talks with Washington after the Hanoi summit between leader Kim Jong Un and US President Donald Trump ended without agreement, one of its top diplomats said Friday.
The warning came amid concerns over the North’s satellite rocket launch site, where some rebuilding activity has been observed in recent weeks, triggering international alarm that Pyongyang might be preparing a long-range missile or space launch.
“We have no intention to yield to the US demands in any form, nor are we willing to engage in negotiations of this kind,” the Russian news agency TASS cited vice foreign minister Choe Son Hui as saying.
Kim would soon make an official statement on the actions his country would take, Choe told reporters and foreign diplomats in Pyongyang.
Trump told a post-summit press conference in Hanoi that the North Korean leader had promised he would maintain his moratorium on missile and nuclear tests.
Any launch would send the denuclearization talks into complete disarray, after they were left stuttering when the summit ended without agreement two weeks ago.
Choe — who was present in Vietnam — blamed the US for the failure, saying Secretary of State Michael Pompeo and National Security Adviser John Bolton “created the atmosphere of hostility and mistrust” and “obstructed” Kim and Trump’s “constructive effort.”
“As a result, the summit ended with no significant result,” she added.
It is a change of tone from Pyongyang, after both sides expressed their willingness to carry on the discussion process in Hanoi.
Ankit Panda, of the Federation of American Scientists, said Kim’s unilateral declaration of the ICBM testing moratorium was “now in question.”
It could mean a decision had already been made, he tweeted, but added that it did not mean a launch was imminent.
“One play is for Kim to reaffirm the moratorium. Kim looks big,” he said. “That also keeps China happy for now.
“Another play is to renounce the moratorium, which would be risky,” as it would upset China, be “disappointing” to Trump, and “squanders the inter-Korean process.”
Seoul’s presidential office sought to play down the vice-minister’s comments, saying it was “premature to assess the current situation only with Choe’s remarks.”
South Korea will continue to work for the resumption of talks, it added.
Washington wants what administration officials have called a “big deal,” with the complete elimination of weapons of mass destruction in return for the dropping of sanctions that have hit the isolated North’s economy.
“Nobody in the administration advocates a step-by-step approach,” a senior State Department official told reporters last week.
The North says it only called for the partial lifting of UN sanctions imposed 2016-17 that affect people’s livelihoods.
But Washington sees these measures as the bulk of economic sanctions that brought Kim to the table, and believes without them it would lose leverage in future talks.
Pyongyang favors a more incremental approach, with Kim proposing dismantling facilities at its Yongbyon nuclear complex in exchange for lifting the main sanctions — an offer Trump refused in Hanoi despite the vaunted “chemistry” between the pair.
In his New Year’s speech — a key political event in the North — Kim said he would be “compelled to find a new way for defending the sovereignty” of the state if Washington “persists in imposing sanctions and pressure.”


UN report: Sex abuse in UN peacekeeping drops, up elsewhere

A UN peacekeeping force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) liaison fixes her colleagues hat as they attend the UNIFLIS's 40th anniversary celebration at its base in Lebanon's southern border town of Naqura on the border with Israel, south of Beirut, on March 19, 2018. (AFP)
Updated 33 min 54 sec ago
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UN report: Sex abuse in UN peacekeeping drops, up elsewhere

  • Guterres said the increase in those allegations was possibly due to "awareness-raising" and improved reporting by the 30 U.N. agencies, funds and programs

UNITED NATIONS: Allegations of sexual exploitation and abuse in U.N. peacekeeping missions decreased in 2018 — but allegations against other U.N. personnel and against staff of organizations implementing U.N. programs increased, according to a U.N. report released Monday.
Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said in a report to the U.N. General Assembly circulated Monday that the alleged victims were mainly women and children.
The United Nations has long been in the spotlight over allegations of child rape and other sexual abuses by its peacekeepers, especially those based in Central African Republic and Congo. But the latest figures demonstrate again that sexual misconduct spans the entire U.N. system and beyond to outside organizations helping to implement its programs on the ground.
Guterres stressed the U.N.'s "zero-tolerance" policy and said he has embarked on "a cultural transformation" to eliminate sexual abuse and exploitation throughout the U.N. system, which comprises more than 90,000 staff and over 100,000 uniformed personnel.
According to the report, the number of cases in U.N. peacekeeping and political missions dropped to 54 in 2018 from 62 in 2017, and from 104 reported cases in 2016. It said 74 percent of the allegations in 2018 came from the U.N. peacekeeping forces in Central African Republic and Congo, and the remaining 24 percent from the peacekeeping missions in Mali, Haiti, Liberia and South Sudan.
By comparison, there were 94 reported cases of sexual exploitation elsewhere in the United Nations system, and 109 allegations involving U.N. partner organizations, the report said.
Guterres said the increase in those allegations was possibly due to "awareness-raising" and improved reporting by the 30 U.N. agencies, funds and programs.
The U.N. chief stressed that continuing allegations of sexual exploitation and abuse "harms those we serve, undermines the United Nations values and principles and tarnishes the reputation of the women and men who work with integrity and dedication to realize the objectives of the organization."