New Zealand terrorist attack: 4 Jordanians dead, 5 injured

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Jordanian barber Wasseim Alsati and his family. (Facebook)
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Jordanian barber Wasseim Alsati and his family. (Facebook)
Updated 16 March 2019
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New Zealand terrorist attack: 4 Jordanians dead, 5 injured

  • Jordan's Foreign Ministry announced the killing of Khaled Haj Musatafa in the shooting
  • Eight others injured, among those two in critical condition

DUBAI: Four Jordanians were killed and five others injured - with two in critical condition - during the New Zealand terrorist attack on two mosques on Friday.

On Friday, Jordan's Foreign Ministry announced that Khaled Haj Musatafa was killed in the attack, while Jordanian barber Wasseim Alsati and his daughter were among those critically injured. The foreign ministry said efforts are being made to provide all assistance and support needed by the victims and their families.

After the incident, Alsati shared a heartfelt video, via his official Facebook account, appealing for people to pray for his injured daughter and confirmed his condition was “hopefully” stable.
“Please pray for my son and my daughters, hopefully she will be so much better,” he said.

 

 

“I’m very sorry I have not been able to answer your calls and messages right now, I am really tired,” Alsati added, saying “it has been a pleasure to know you all and thank you for the support and all the help that you have given me so far.”

Alsati opened up a barber shop called Wass’ Barbers in Christchurch, where he and his family have been living for many years.

Wasseim was hit with four bullets, two in his back, one in the stomach and another in his foot, while his daughter was hit with three bullets.

Read more: At least 49 killed as gunman livestreams New Zealand mosque ‘terrorist attacks’

Jordanian Foreign ministry said in a statement in the aftermath of the shooting incident that it is believed that two Jordanians were among the victims of the terrorist attacks.

The ministry added that they are following up on the matter to ensure the victims are safe and are being treated accordingly. Foreign Minister Ayman Safadi said on his twitter account “We condemn the horrific barbaric attacks against innocent worshippers in #NewZealandShooting mosque. Our thoughts and prayers are with the victims and their families. Terrorism in all its forms and it’s ideology of hate is a common enemy that we must fight together.”

At least 49 people, including children, were killed, and 50 others critically injured when a gunman opened fire on Masjid Al Noor mosque and Linwood mosque in New Zealand.

Read more: Muslim world reacts at New Zealand terrorist attacks on mosque

New Zealand police detained three men and a woman, with one of them being charged with murder. 

One of four people detained in New Zealand after mass shootings at two mosques in Christchurch is Australian, Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison said.


Security tops agenda as Iraqi PM visits Egypt in first foreign trip

Updated 23 March 2019
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Security tops agenda as Iraqi PM visits Egypt in first foreign trip

  • After meeting Egyptian President Abdel Fattah El-Sisi, Abdul Mahdi highlighted “the importance of drying up the sources of terrorism”
  • The visit to Egypt is Abdul Mahdi’s first trip abroad since taking office in October

CAIRO: Iraqi Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi sought Egypt’s support for efforts to tackle extremist militants in the region during a visit to Cairo on Saturday, his first trip abroad since taking office in October.
After meeting Egyptian President Abdel Fattah El-Sisi, Abdul Mahdi highlighted “the importance of drying up the sources of terrorism” and said “cooperation between Egypt and Iraq will be essential for this matter,” according to an official statement.
His comments came as US-backed forces said they had captured Daesh’s last shred of territory in eastern Syria at Baghouz, ending its territorial rule over a self-proclaimed caliphate straddling Syria and Iraq after years of fighting.
Though the defeat ends the group’s grip over the extremist quasi-state that it declared in 2014, it remains a threat.
Some Daesh fighters still hold out in Syria’s remote central desert and in Iraqi cities they have slipped into the shadows, staging sudden shootings or kidnappings and awaiting a chance to rise again.
The United States thinks the group’s leader, Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi, is in Iraq.
Defeating militants in Egypt’s Sinai Peninsula and restoring security after years of unrest has been a key promise of El-Sisi, the general-turned-president who came to power a year after the military overthrew Islamist President Mohammed Mursi in 2013.
Egypt has fought an insurgency waged by a Daesh affiliate in North Sinai since 2013. Hundreds of members of the security forces have been killed.