New Zealand terrorist attack: 4 Jordanians dead, 5 injured

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Jordanian barber Wasseim Alsati and his family. (Facebook)
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Jordanian barber Wasseim Alsati and his family. (Facebook)
Updated 16 March 2019
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New Zealand terrorist attack: 4 Jordanians dead, 5 injured

  • Jordan's Foreign Ministry announced the killing of Khaled Haj Musatafa in the shooting
  • Eight others injured, among those two in critical condition

DUBAI: Four Jordanians were killed and five others injured - with two in critical condition - during the New Zealand terrorist attack on two mosques on Friday.

On Friday, Jordan's Foreign Ministry announced that Khaled Haj Musatafa was killed in the attack, while Jordanian barber Wasseim Alsati and his daughter were among those critically injured. The foreign ministry said efforts are being made to provide all assistance and support needed by the victims and their families.

After the incident, Alsati shared a heartfelt video, via his official Facebook account, appealing for people to pray for his injured daughter and confirmed his condition was “hopefully” stable.
“Please pray for my son and my daughters, hopefully she will be so much better,” he said.

 

 

“I’m very sorry I have not been able to answer your calls and messages right now, I am really tired,” Alsati added, saying “it has been a pleasure to know you all and thank you for the support and all the help that you have given me so far.”

Alsati opened up a barber shop called Wass’ Barbers in Christchurch, where he and his family have been living for many years.

Wasseim was hit with four bullets, two in his back, one in the stomach and another in his foot, while his daughter was hit with three bullets.

Read more: At least 49 killed as gunman livestreams New Zealand mosque ‘terrorist attacks’

Jordanian Foreign ministry said in a statement in the aftermath of the shooting incident that it is believed that two Jordanians were among the victims of the terrorist attacks.

The ministry added that they are following up on the matter to ensure the victims are safe and are being treated accordingly. Foreign Minister Ayman Safadi said on his twitter account “We condemn the horrific barbaric attacks against innocent worshippers in #NewZealandShooting mosque. Our thoughts and prayers are with the victims and their families. Terrorism in all its forms and it’s ideology of hate is a common enemy that we must fight together.”

At least 49 people, including children, were killed, and 50 others critically injured when a gunman opened fire on Masjid Al Noor mosque and Linwood mosque in New Zealand.

Read more: Muslim world reacts at New Zealand terrorist attacks on mosque

New Zealand police detained three men and a woman, with one of them being charged with murder. 

One of four people detained in New Zealand after mass shootings at two mosques in Christchurch is Australian, Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison said.


Amnesty urges Lebanon to help end domestic worker abuse

An Asian domestic worker walks her employer's dog in the Lebanese capital of Beirut, on April 23, 2019. (AFP)
Updated 59 min 57 sec ago
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Amnesty urges Lebanon to help end domestic worker abuse

  • Ethiopia and the Philippines have banned their citizens from domestic work in Lebanon, but still their citizens find ways to come

BEIRUT: Amnesty International on Wednesday urged Lebanon to end what it described as an “inherently abusive” migration sponsorship system governing the lives of tens of thousands of foreigners working in private homes.
Domestic workers in Lebanon are excluded from the labor law, and instead obtain legal residency though their employers’ sponsorship under the so-called “kafala” system.
But activists say this leaves the maids, nannies and carers at the mercy of their employers and unable to leave without their permission, including in numerous documented cases of abuse.
“Amnesty International is calling on the Lebanese authorities to end the kafala system and extend labor protections to migrant domestic workers,” the London-based rights group said.
“The Lebanese parliament should amend the labor law to include domestic workers under its protection,” including to allow them to join unions, the group said.
Lebanon hosts more than 250,000 registered domestic workers from countries in Africa and Asia, the vast majority of them women.
In a report released Wednesday titled “Their house is my prison,” Amnesty surveyed 32 domestic workers employed mostly in and around Beirut, revealing “alarming patterns of abuse.”
Among them, 10 women said they were not allowed to leave their employer’s house, with some saying they were locked in.
Twenty-seven said their employers had confiscated their passports.
Many worked overtime, 14 were not allowed a single day off each week, and several had their monthly salaries revoked or decreased, despite it being a breach of their contracts.
The labor ministry introduced a standard contract for domestic workers in 2009, but the forms are often written in Arabic, a language they cannot read.
The government in late 2018 said it had translated the contracts into several other languages.
Amnesty registered eight cases of forced labor and four of human trafficking, the report said.
Six reported severe physical abuse, while almost all had been subjected to humiliating treatment and several were deprived of food.
“Sometimes I would get so hungry... I used to mix water with sugar when I was hungry and drink it,” one worker said.
With the abuse taking a toll on their mental health, six said they had contemplated or attempted suicide.
Only four of those interviewed had private rooms, while the rest were relegated to living rooms, storage rooms, kitchens or balconies.
“There is a man in the house who can enter the living room any time he wants,” said one worker who was forced to sleep in the living room.
Activists accuse the Lebanese authorities of being lax in bringing abusive employers to account.
Ethiopia and the Philippines have banned their citizens from domestic work in Lebanon, but still their citizens find ways to come.
In 2008, Human Rights Watch found that migrant domestic workers in Lebanon were dying at a rate of more than one per week from suicide or in failed escapes.
Many other countries in the Arab world also follow the “kafala” system for household workers.