New Zealand terrorist attack: 4 Jordanians dead, 5 injured

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Jordanian barber Wasseim Alsati and his family. (Facebook)
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Jordanian barber Wasseim Alsati and his family. (Facebook)
Updated 16 March 2019
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New Zealand terrorist attack: 4 Jordanians dead, 5 injured

  • Jordan's Foreign Ministry announced the killing of Khaled Haj Musatafa in the shooting
  • Eight others injured, among those two in critical condition

DUBAI: Four Jordanians were killed and five others injured - with two in critical condition - during the New Zealand terrorist attack on two mosques on Friday.

On Friday, Jordan's Foreign Ministry announced that Khaled Haj Musatafa was killed in the attack, while Jordanian barber Wasseim Alsati and his daughter were among those critically injured. The foreign ministry said efforts are being made to provide all assistance and support needed by the victims and their families.

After the incident, Alsati shared a heartfelt video, via his official Facebook account, appealing for people to pray for his injured daughter and confirmed his condition was “hopefully” stable.
“Please pray for my son and my daughters, hopefully she will be so much better,” he said.

 

 

“I’m very sorry I have not been able to answer your calls and messages right now, I am really tired,” Alsati added, saying “it has been a pleasure to know you all and thank you for the support and all the help that you have given me so far.”

Alsati opened up a barber shop called Wass’ Barbers in Christchurch, where he and his family have been living for many years.

Wasseim was hit with four bullets, two in his back, one in the stomach and another in his foot, while his daughter was hit with three bullets.

Read more: At least 49 killed as gunman livestreams New Zealand mosque ‘terrorist attacks’

Jordanian Foreign ministry said in a statement in the aftermath of the shooting incident that it is believed that two Jordanians were among the victims of the terrorist attacks.

The ministry added that they are following up on the matter to ensure the victims are safe and are being treated accordingly. Foreign Minister Ayman Safadi said on his twitter account “We condemn the horrific barbaric attacks against innocent worshippers in #NewZealandShooting mosque. Our thoughts and prayers are with the victims and their families. Terrorism in all its forms and it’s ideology of hate is a common enemy that we must fight together.”

At least 49 people, including children, were killed, and 50 others critically injured when a gunman opened fire on Masjid Al Noor mosque and Linwood mosque in New Zealand.

Read more: Muslim world reacts at New Zealand terrorist attacks on mosque

New Zealand police detained three men and a woman, with one of them being charged with murder. 

One of four people detained in New Zealand after mass shootings at two mosques in Christchurch is Australian, Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison said.


Iraq lifts nearly 30 km of blast walls from Baghdad: official

Updated 8 min 18 sec ago
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Iraq lifts nearly 30 km of blast walls from Baghdad: official

BAGHDAD: Iraqi authorities have removed nearly 30 kilometers of concrete blast walls across Baghdad in the last six months, mostly around the capital’s high-security Green Zone, a senior official told AFP.
Since the US-led invasion of Iraq in 2003, T-walls — thick barriers about six meters tall and one meter wide — have surrounded potential targets of car bombs or other attacks.
When premier Adel Abdel Mahdi came to power last year, he promised to remove barriers, checkpoints and other security measures to make Baghdad easier to navigate.
“Over the last six months, we removed 18,000 T-walls in Baghdad, including 14,000 in the Green Zone alone,” said Staff Lt. Gen. Mohammed Al-Bayati, the PM’s top military adviser.
Hundreds of the security checkpoints that contributed to Baghdad’s notorious traffic jams have also been removed.
And according to the Baghdad municipality, 600 streets that had been closed off to public access have been opened in the last six months.
Among them are key routes crossing through Baghdad’s Green Zone, the enclave where government buildings, UN agencies and embassies including the US and UK missions are based.
It was long inaccessible to most Iraqis until an order from Abdel Mahdi last year, and families can now be seen picking their way across its manicured parks for sunset pictures.
Iraq is living a rare period of calm after consecutive decades of violence, which for Baghdad peaked during the sectarian battles from 2006 to 2008.
It was followed, in 2014, by Daesh’s sweep across a third of the country and a three-year battle to oust the militants from their urban strongholds.
The group still wages hit-and-run attacks against Iraqi security forces and government targets, and Baghdad’s authorities are on high alert.
Thousands of the removed T-walls have been placed on Baghdad’s outskirts to prevent infiltration by Daesh sleeper cells, according to Bayati.