Aladdin’s Naomi Scott walks the (magic) carpet in Los Angeles

Updated 24 March 2019
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Aladdin’s Naomi Scott walks the (magic) carpet in Los Angeles

DUBAI: British-Indian “Aladdin” actress Naomi Scott strutted down the orange carpet at the Nickelodeon’s Kids’ Choice Awards in Los Angeles on Saturday night, while Lebanese teenage singing sensation Lynn Al-Hayek was voted the “Favorite Arab Music Artist” by her fans.

This year’s kid-friendly show was hosted by US-Palestinian producer and social media star DJ Khaled and saw the stars of the upcoming live-action version of Disney’s “Aladdin” — Will Smith, Mena Massoud and Naomi Scott — hit the orange carpet before they floated down onto the stage on a platform made to look like Aladdin’s magic carpet.  

Before taking to the stage, Scott walked the carpet in a soda-orange, feathered coat with a silvery, metallic sweatshirt underneath. She finished off the fun look with black drainpipe trousers and shiny boots.

The annual award show is famous for dousing celebrity attendees with green slime, much to the delight of the children in the audience. This year, Hollywood’s Chris Pratt, Josh Peck and Adam Sandler were soaked from head to toe and the show culminated with DJ Khaled blanketing both himself and the crowd in green goo.

There was no shortage of star power at the event, with the likes of Jennifer Hudson, Janelle Monáe, Bebe Rexha and YouTube sensation Lilly Singh spotted in the audience.

Two Arab stars even made it into the list of winners — teenage singer Lynn Al-Hayek, who won The Voice Kids in 2016, and internet blogger Noor Stars took home awards for Favorite Arab Music Artist and Favorite Arab Internet Star respectively.

Hip-hop trio Migos performed their hits “Walk It Talk It” and “Stir Fry,” along with rising single “Pure Water,” accompanied by DJ Durel before adrenaline-packed teenage YouTube star JoJo Siwa forced DJ Khaled to don one of her signature hair bows after he lost a dance battle.


UAE gift helps French palace reopen ‘forgotten theater’

Updated 16 min 52 sec ago
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UAE gift helps French palace reopen ‘forgotten theater’

  • Now called the Sheikh Khalifa bin Zayed Al-Nahyan Theatre, it is the latest example of the close relations between Paris and Abu Dhabi
  • The UAE capital already hosts the Louvre Abu Dhabi, opened by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Zayed and President Emmanuel Macron in 2017

FONTAINEBLEAU: An exquisite 19th-century French theater outside Paris that fell into disuse for one and half centuries has been restored with the help of a €10 million donation from oil-rich Abu Dhabi.
The Napoleon III theater at Fontainebleau Palace south of Paris was built between 1853 and 1856 under the reign of the nephew of emperor Napoleon I.
It opened in 1857 but was used only a dozen times, which has helped preserve its gilded adornments, before being abandoned in 1870 after the fall of Napoleon III.
But during a state visit to France in 2007, Sheikh Khalifa, ruler of Abu Dhabi and president of the United Arab Emirates, was reportedly entranced by the abandoned theater and offered €10 million ($11.2 million) on the spot for its restoration.
After a project that has lasted 12 years the theater is now being reopened.
An official inauguration is expected soon, hosted by French Culture Minister Franck Riester and attended by UAE Foreign Minister Abdullah bin Zayed Al-Nahyan.
Now called the Sheikh Khalifa bin Zayed Al-Nahyan Theatre, it is the latest example of the close relations between Paris and Abu Dhabi.
The UAE capital already hosts the Louvre Abu Dhabi, opened by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Zayed and President Emmanuel Macron in 2017, the first foreign institution to carry the name of the great Paris museum.
For all its ornate beauty, the theater has hardly ever been used for its orginal purpose, hosting only a dozen performances between 1857 and 1868, each attended by around 400 people.
“While it had been forgotten, the theater was in an almost perfect state,” said the head of the Fontainebleau Palace, Jean-Francois Hebert.
“Let us not waste this jewel, and show this extraordinary place of decorative arts,” he added.
According to the palace, the theater is “probably the last in Europe to have kept almost all its original machinery, lighting and decor.”
Having such a theater was the desire of Napoleon III’s wife Eugenie. But after the defeat, his capture in the Franco-Prussian war in 1870 and the declaration of France’s Third Republic, the theater fell into virtual oblivion.
Following the renovation, the theater will mainly be a place to visit and admire, rather than for regularly holding concerts.
“The aim is not to give the theater back to its first vocation” given its “very fragile structure,” said Hebert.
Short shows and recitals may be performed in exceptional cases, under the tightest security measures and fire regulations. But regular guided tours will allow visitors to discover the site, including the stage sets.
The restoration aimed to use as little new material as possible, with 80 percent of the original material preserved.
The opulent central chandelier — three meters high and 2.5 meters wide — has been restored to its original form.