Saudi Arabia, UAE to give Sudan $3 billion, including $500 million in Central Bank

: Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates have granted Sudan $3 billion in support, following a wave of protests removed Omar Al-Bashir. (AFP)
Updated 22 April 2019
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Saudi Arabia, UAE to give Sudan $3 billion, including $500 million in Central Bank

  • The Kingdom and the UAE called for "stability" and a "peaceful transition" in Sudan
  • The rest will be in the form of food, medicine, and petroleum products

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates have granted Sudan $3 billion in support, Saudi Press Agency said on Sunday.

The grant includes a $500 million deposit into Sudan's central bank, in a bid to strengthen its financial position, ease pressure on the Sudanese pound and achieve greater stability in the exchange rate, SPA reported

The rest will be in the form of food, medicine, and petroleum products, the report said.

In recent years Sudan has been hit by an acute lack of dollars, a key factor behind the nationwide protests that led to the toppling of Al-Bashir by the army this month.

The Kingdom and the UAE called for "stability" and a "peaceful transition" in the days following the removal of Al-Bashir.

The aid from Saudi Arabia and the Emirates is the first major publicly announced assistance to Sudan from Gulf states in several years.

"This is to strengthen its financial position, ease the pressure on the Sudanese pound and increase stability in the exchange rate," the Saudi Press Agency said.

Since Al-Bashir's ousting, the Sudanese pound has steadily strengthened on the black market, and on Sunday it jumped to 45 to the dollar, after trading at 72 at one stage last week.

The official exchange rate is 47.5 pounds to the dollar.


UN envoy warns of ‘long and bloody war’ in Libya

Updated 8 min 47 sec ago
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UN envoy warns of ‘long and bloody war’ in Libya

UNITED NATIONS: The UN envoy for Libya warned Tuesday the battle for Tripoli was “just the start of a long and bloody war” and called for immediate steps to cut off arms flows fueling the fighting.
Addressing the Security Council, Ghassan Salame said many countries were supplying weapons to the UN-recognized government in Tripoli and forces led by Khalifa Haftar.
Haftar launched an offensive on April 4 to seize the capital but his forces have been bogged down in the southern outskirts of Tripoli.
“The violence on the outskirts of Tripoli is just the start of a long and bloody war on the southern shores of the Mediterranean, imperilling the security of Libya’s immediate neighbors and the wider Mediterranean region,” Salame said.
Without immediate action to stop the flow of arms, “Libya will descend into civil war which could potentially lead to a Hobbesian all-against-all state of chaos or partition of the country,” he said.
Salame also said that Daesh has begun to reappear in Libya, and have set up flags in the south of the country.
The Security Council failed last month to agree on a draft resolution demanding a cease-fire in Libya and a return to political talks to end the conflict.
Russia refused to include any mention of Haftar’s offensive on Tripoli while the United States said it needed more time to consider the situation, diplomats said.
The envoy urged the council to set up a commission of inquiry to “determine who has taken up arms” and prevent indicted war crimes suspects from taking part in military operations.
More than 75,000 people have been driven from their homes in the latest fighting and 510 have been killed, according to the World Health Organization.