Muslims, Christians join forces to fight Egyptian church fire

In this Friday, Dec. 29, 2017 file photo, a policeman stands guard in front of Mar Mina church after a deadly attack claimed by the Islamic State group, in Helwan, Cairo, Egypt. (AP)
Updated 27 April 2019

Muslims, Christians join forces to fight Egyptian church fire

  • Despite its unique architectural value, the landmark church of Mar Girgis was demolished a few months ago following a demolition order

ABU QURQAS, Egypt: Muslim and Christian worshippers in an Egyptian city turned firefighters to tackle a blaze at the site of a recently demolished church.
Local residents, who spotted smoke billowing from a camp in the grounds of the Coptic Orthodox church of Mar Girgis (St. George) in Abu Qurqas, Minya province, raced to the scene and worked together to extinguish flames.
By the time fire crews arrived the blaze had been put out. There were no casualties and officials are investigating the cause.

Landmark church
In a statement, the Coptic Orthodox Church said the fire broke out at 4 a.m. and all the camp’s contents were destroyed.
Despite its unique architectural value, the landmark church of Mar Girgis was demolished a few months ago following a demolition order.
Archaeologist Dr. Monica Hanna said the church had contained valuable oil paintings and other historical features.


Family stayed in Syrian town during offensive as fighters ousted

Updated 10 min 11 sec ago

Family stayed in Syrian town during offensive as fighters ousted

  • A renewed push by Syrian regime and Russian forces to take the area has seen heavy strikes and advances this week in the south of Idlib province

KHAN SHEIKHOUN: Russia-backed Syrian regime forces found Abu Abdo and family this week in Khan Sheikhoun, a town which almost all other residents had fled during shelling in an offensive to take the area from opposition fighters.

“The last month was very bad. We couldn’t stand by the door because of the shelling ... We couldn’t go anywhere,” 55-year-old Abu Abdo told Reuters.

He said his was one of only around three families that stayed in the town through the offensive while all other civilians fled north, away from the shelling.

“When the army came they opened the door of the house and entered, thinking no one was here. But when they saw us they were very respectful and asked us what we needed,” he said from his house which had a couple of shell holes in the walls.

Khan Sheikhoun was one of the towns lost early in the eight-year-old war to opposition fighters opposed to the rule of Syria’s Bashar Assad. On Friday the Syrian forces said they had taken it back, along with a handful of other settlements.

“The fighters ran away a day before the army entered. There was a huge number of fighters here,” Abu Abdo said, referring to the opposition.

A renewed push by Syrian regime and Russian forces to take the area has seen heavy strikes and advances this week in the south of Idlib province and nearby Hama, prompting a civilian exodus.

Hundreds of people have been killed in the campaign since late April and more than 500,000 people have been displaced, the UN said.

“The operation (to take Khan Sheikhoun) was difficult. The rebels were holed up for a month under heavy, continuous bombardment. Which caused them to withdraw to the north,” a military official said.

A Reuters team traveled to Khan Sheikhoun up a newly opened and de-mined part of the main south-north highway which once connected the capital Damascus to Aleppo. The sound of planes and distant explosions could still be heard in the large town in south Idlib province, heavily damaged by repeated aerial campaigns.

Khan Sheikhoun made headlines in 2017. Nearly 100 people died when the town was bombed with sarin poison gas. One of the deadliest chemical weapons attacks of the war, it prompted a US missile strike against a Syrian air base.