Coalition returns Yemeni families to villages liberated from Houthi militias

Yemenis gather in a street in an old market on April 27, 2019, in Yemen's third city of Taiz after clashes between pro-government militias left two children dead. (AFP / Ahmad Al-Basha)
Updated 30 April 2019
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Coalition returns Yemeni families to villages liberated from Houthi militias

  • The displaced residents were from 12 villages in the Wadi Abu Jabara area

RIYADH: One hundred families have returned to their homes after the Saudi-led coalition in Yemen liberated areas from the control of Iranian-backed Houthi militias.

Coalition spokesman Col. Turki Al-Maliki said on Monday that the Yemeni National Army with the support of the coalition seized back parts of Saada in the north-west of the country.

As a result, citizens forcibly displaced from their farms and homes in 12 villages in the Wadi Abu Jabara area, were allowed to return. Al-Maliki said the coalition had assigned a special delegation to oversee the resettlement operation.

Al-Maliki pointed out that Houthi militias had unsuccessfully tried to target the House of Representatives with the use of drones. “We continue to target the militias’ drones in Sanaa,” he said.

The military spokesman added that the Houthis had continued to threaten to blow up a floating crude oil tank, an act which would lead to an environmental and economic disaster.

In all its operations, Al-Maliki stressed that the coalition was doing everything it possibly could to avoid civilian casualties.

He also revealed that the King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Center (KSRelief) was launching a second voluntary medical operation to carry out heart surgery and catheterization for Yemeni children.

“This campaign is part of a series of various voluntary campaigns carried out by the center in Yemen and other countries,” said Al-Maliki.

A medical team sent to the port city of Mukalla performed 95 heart operations and a successful pediatric catheterization procedure. Al-Maliki said the surgery required high-tech medical equipment and specialized teams, the cost of which was covered by KSRelief.

Al-Maliki said the total number of Houthi violations of the Swedish agreement had reached 3,811. Militias were still planting mines that threatened global shipping routes in the southern Red Sea.

There were 226 ballistic missiles launched by Houthi terrorists toward Saudi Arabia between March 26, 2015, and April 29 this year.

Several relief ports are open for Yemen (air, sea, land), and the total number of maritime permits issued by the Joint Forces Command from March 26, 2015, to April 29, 2019, was 5,713. Air permits for the same period were granted for 15,168 passengers. There were 1,357 land permits during this period. Permits and orders to secure the movements of relief organizations inside Yemen from April 22 to 28, 2019, topped 332.

Total Houthi weapon losses from April 15 to 29, 2019, were 200 and the number of Houthis dead was 1,002.


Turkey orders arrest of 128 military personnel over suspected Gulen links

Updated 3 min 13 sec ago
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Turkey orders arrest of 128 military personnel over suspected Gulen links

  • Arrested military personnel are suspected of being supporters of US-based Muslim cleric Fethullah Gulen
  • Rights groups and Turkey’s Western allies have criticized the scope of the crackdown
ANKARA: Turkey has ordered the arrest of 128 military personnel over suspected links to the network accused by Ankara of orchestrating an attempted coup in 2016, state-run Anadolu news agency said on Tuesday.
Police were looking for just over half of the suspects in the western coastal province of Izmir and the rest across 30 other provinces, Anadolu said.
They were suspected of being supporters of US-based Muslim cleric Fethullah Gulen, who is accused by Turkish authorities of masterminding the failed putsch three years ago. Gulen has denied any role.
More than 77,000 people have been jailed pending trial, while about 150,000 people from the civil service, military, and elsewhere have been sacked or suspended from their jobs under crackdowns since the attempted coup.
Rights groups and Turkey’s Western allies have criticized the scope of the crackdown, saying Erdogan has used the abortive coup as a pretext to quash dissent.
The government has said the security measures are necessary due to the gravity of the threat Turkey faces, and has vowed to eradicate Gulen’s network in the country.