Saudi Arabia’s aid agency steps up medical help, signs agreements to treat wounded Yemenis

A KSRelief team distributed food baskets among Palestinian and Syrian refugees and needy Lebanese families in parts of Lebanon. (SPA)
Updated 01 May 2019

Saudi Arabia’s aid agency steps up medical help, signs agreements to treat wounded Yemenis

  • KSRelief team distributed 1,750 food baskets to Lebanese families, Palestinian and Syrian refugees in the town of Miniyeh in northern Lebanon and in the Ain Al-Hilweh refugee camp in southern Lebanon

RIYADH: The King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Center (KSRelief) has increased its medical assistance in Yemen ahead of Ramadan, signing agreements for the treatment of wounded Yemenis, women and children.
Dr. Abdullah Al-Moallem, head of the health and environmental aid department at KSRelief, said that the center has signed three agreements.
The first agreement was signed with Al-Safwa Hospital in Taiz to provide in-country health care services to 100 wounded Yemenis.
He said that the goals of the current project are to continue to reduce the rate of long-term complications from injuries and to improve local Yemeni health services.
The new agreement, which will help to fund treatment for 100 people in the Taiz governorate, is expected to cost $400,000, he said.
Indicating that this agreement is just one of many of the Kingdom’s efforts to provide comprehensive services to the health sector in Yemen, Al-Moallem said that KSRelief had signed another agreement, which is an extension contract for a refugee camp in Al-Khokha district, targeted recently by a grenade attack by Houthi militants.
The refugee camp is funded by the KSRelief program for internally displaced persons from Hodeidah, and services include running clinics for refugees, treating patients, follow-up appointments for pregnant women, vaccinations for children, and combating malnutrition as well as infection control.
This is expected to cost $1.6 million for a contract period of nine months, Al-Moallem said.
The center has also signed an agreement for health clinics in Hajjah governorate in northwestern Yemen at a cost of $1.285 million for a contract period of one year, he said.
Meanwhile, a KSRelief team distributed 1,750 food baskets to Lebanese families, Palestinian and Syrian refugees in the town of Miniyeh in northern Lebanon and in the Ain Al-Hilweh refugee camp in southern Lebanon.
This comes within the framework of humanitarian and relief assistance provided by the Kingdom represented by the center to meet the food needs of the Lebanese people and Arabs displaced during Ramadan.


Two new academies to boost Saudi arts, heritage and music

Updated 19 August 2019

Two new academies to boost Saudi arts, heritage and music

  • One academy specializing in heritage and traditional arts and crafts will start receiving applications in autumn 2020
  • A second academy dedicated to music will receive 1,000 students and trainees from 2021

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia is to set up arts academies, including two in the next two years, offering a step toward academic qualification and enlarging the Kingdom’s footprint in heritage, arts and crafts, and music.

The initiative is part of the Ministry of Culture’s Quality of Life program. 

The minister, Prince Badr bin Abdullah bin Mohammed bin Farhan, said investment in “capacity building” was one of the most important elements in encouraging the cultural sector, which enjoyed unlimited support from King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.

The Kingdom was rich in diverse arts, talents and artistic production, Prince Badr said, and the academies would be a first step toward academic qualification in the arts within the Kingdom.

One academy specializing in heritage and traditional arts and crafts will start receiving applications in autumn 2020, targeting 1,000 students and trainees in long- and short-term programs. 

A second academy dedicated to music will receive 1,000 students and trainees from 2021.

The music academy in particular will be “the core of music production and talent development in Saudi Arabia,” Saudi musician, composer and producer Mamdouh Saif told Arab News.

The music industry was a large and diverse field, Saif said, and education was crucial. 

“The academy is the right place to launch the music industry in Saudi Arabia, and it will have a significant impact on Saudi youth, and young people in surrounding countries,” he said.

He expects “a very high turnout” for the academy among young Saudis. 

“Due to my expertise in this area, I receive many questions from people who want to learn music, but through private lessons,” he said.

“But the availability of an academy for this purpose, that teaches music in a methodological way, will be the right start for those interested in music.”